Tag Archives: dental insurance

Periodontal surgery exposed

While some people think that “the more you know, the less you need to say” (Jim Rohn)…

This is certainly not the case when it comes to your oral health

The MORE you know about the state of your oral health, the MORE you need to speak up and tell your dentist about any issues or concerns you have.

Because the dismal reality is that if you don’t say anything, these problems WILL progress and potentially develop into diseases. Furthermore, you may need to have periodontal surgery.

Here’s what YOU need to know!

What Is Periodontal Surgery?

To get started, let’s first take a look at the definition of periodontal:

PERIODONTALRelating to or affecting the structures surrounding and supporting the teeth

Therefore, periodontal surgery refers to any surgery that focuses on the structures surrounding the teeth, such as your gums or bones.

Types of Periodontal Surgery

If you have developed gum disease, receding gum lines, or other issues with your gums, your periodontist may recommend periodontal surgery to treat and fix these issues.

There are a variety of procedures available depending on what your treatment plan requires:

Pocket ReductionAlso known as gingival flap surgery.

The surgeon folds back the gums and removes bacteria.

The gum tissue is then secured against your teeth (instead of letting it grow back itself)
Crown LengtheningAlso known as gingivectomy.

Gum tissue overgrowth is removed from your teeth.

Makes teeth appear longer.

Used for cosmetic effects a s well as to treat gum disease.
RegenerationThe periodontist folds back the gums and removes bacteria that causes diseases.

Bone grafts, tissue-stimulating proteins, or
membranes are then inserted to encourage gum
tissue regeneration.

The aim is to get the gums to fit securely around your teeth again.
Soft Tissue GraftAlso know an gingivoplasty.

Gum tissue is taken from elsewhere in your mouth
and attached to your gums.

Replaces gum tissue that has receded or damaged by gum disease.

Used for cosmetic purposes and improves the
appearance of your teeth.

Also treats gum disease because it covers exposed
roots


If you are unsure if you are a candidate for gum surgery or which type of gum surgery is best for you, a thorough examination by your dentist can determine what you need.

Cost of Periodontal Surgery

Depending on the severity of your disease and the type of procedure required, the cost of gum surgery varies GREATLY.

With prices between $500 to $10,000 and more, many insurance companies will cover at least part of the gum surgery cost. While these prices may seem shocking, delaying treatment can lead to more expensive and complex procedures in the future.

The main factors that affect costs are:

  • The location of your dentist.
  • The technology used in your procedure.
  • The type of treatment required.
  • The type of dental insurance you have.

With these factors in mind, here are the approximate costs for gum surgery:

Gingival flap surgeryTypically costs between $1000 and $3000 without insurance
GingivectomyAbout $200 to $400 per tooth
GingivoplastyAround  $600 to $1,200 per procedure

If your full mouth needs periodontal treatment and will require a variety of treatments, the total cost can average $4,000 to $6,000. However, if the damage is extensive it can cost you anywhere from $8,000 to $10,000.

If you have addressed your underlying oral health issues but still aren’t satisfied with the appearance of your teeth…. LISTEN UP (and keep reading)!

The Best Way To A Brighter & Whiter Smile

You can unlock your smile’s potential with Lab Direct custom removable veneers from Brighter Image Lab!

We know that our customized veneers are sustainable and cost effective compared to traditional dental visits and in-office cosmetic dental appointments.

Check out these incredible reasons why removable veneers are a great choice to make your smile sparkle:

Enhances estheticsWhitens & brightens teethLengthens small teeth
Reshapes smileHighlights your smileIncreases confidence
Fills unsightly gapsRemoves stainsAlters the look of teeth

Furthermore, you can easily take the first step in creating your custom veneers from the comfort of your couch because there is no need to visit a dentist. All of the materials you need to get started are delivered directly to your house.

No matter what type of result you are looking for, your dental dreams can come true with Brighter Image Lab.

Our custom molds prevent over exaggerated dental costs for non-oral health threatening treatments.

You really can bring your smile to its ultimate level… without paying $20,000+ for a cosmetic smile makeover.

Let us introduce you to the life changing magic of removable dental veneers.

Join us as we welcome you to the future of smile design.

Come see how we can improve your smile in a way that you never thought imaginable. You truly owe it to yourself to look at BrighterImageLab.com.

Fix Your Smile Today - Learn More
Does the best cosmetic dentist even exist?

You’ve decided it’s time to find the best cosmetic dentist to correct your crooked, cracked, discolored, or missing teeth. You’ve gotten a raise at your job, saved enough money, inherited wealth, or maybe even won the lottery. If you have dental insurance, it won’t cover procedures considered cosmetic. Most, if not all, of your upcoming cosmetic dental work will be paid out of your pocket. However, you’re “done” with putting up with a smile that doesn’t feel quite right.

Does the best cosmetic dentist even exist?
Does the best cosmetic dentist even exist?

Does the best cosmetic dentist exist?

Your first thought is to find out which local dentists studied cosmetic dentistry in dental school. Oddly, you cannot find a single “cosmetic” dentist in your area who mentions specializing in this field in dental school. Consequently, you question a co-worker who recently received dental implants and learn that the term “cosmetic dentistry” is not used by dental schools to describe a chosen branch of collegiate study. In fact, all dentists upon graduating from dental school are legally qualified to perform what is known to the public as “cosmetic dental surgery” and to advertise as such.

This knowledge leaves you with few concrete options for differentiating between dentists who call themselves “cosmetic dentists.”  While it appears that many dentists take courses or attend conferences to learn more about the craft of “cosmetic dentistry,” apparently the American Dental Association (ADA) does not require or regulate this further education.

How much does a dentist earn an hour?

You can easily see why selecting a “cosmetic” dentist to entrust your money and your teeth can be daunting. Cosmetic dental work is usually a lifelong process, especially if you’re considering getting permanent dental veneers. This requires the dentist grind down the teeth beforehand and it requires years of professional upkeep as veneers crack or fall off.

With so many dentists to choose from and so much to learn when considering cosmetic dentistry, you’re beginning to think life was simpler before you won the lottery.

Who is the most famous cosmetic dentist?

Before signing up with a cosmetic dentist and a lifelong plan for invasive dental work, you might first consider the smile solution offered by Brighter Image Lab (brighterimagelab.com), an online dental lab that custom designs and manufactures affordable but state-of-the-art, removable dental veneers starting at $795 as an alternative to expensive, invasive, and permanent cosmetic dental procedures. Hence, many of our clients find what they thought would be a temporary veneer solution by Brighter Image Lab becomes the only cosmetic dental solution they could ever want or need.

Brighter Image Lab, however, encourages people to do their research and learn as much as they can about what cosmetic dentists in their area have to offer.

In fact, there are six questions that we recommend asking a cosmetic dentist before entrusting your funds and your teeth to him or her:

  1. How many surgeries or procedures of the kind that I need has this cosmetic dentist performed, and for how long?
    Without formal cosmetic dentistry credentials to display, there is little way of knowing a dentist’s true qualifications in performing cosmetic dental procedures other than how many he or she has performed and for how long. Due to this, you should be sure to find out exactly how many surgeries (of the kind you seek) your cosmetic dentist has performed and for how long he or she has been practicing them.
  2. Has a cosmetic dental procedure performed by this dentist ever gone wrong? If so, how many times has this occurred?
    If you are able to get the answers to these questions from a cosmetic dentist, consider yourself fortunate. You should also ask the dentist if he or she is willing to re-do any work that does not produce the intended result.
  3. Where does this cosmetic dentist get the materials for screws, fillings, crowns, veneers, and other dental materials used in his or her practice?
    All materials used in your cosmetic dental surgery or procedure should come from dental labs in the United States. The government regulates these labs and as a result, provide dental hardware made of safe, quality, more lasting materials. Dental hardware ordered from unregulated labs in China, for instance, is not necessarily the same quality, nor can the safety be trusted. Dentists have ordered materials from labs overseas because of the cost savings. The dentist pockets the savings in most cases, not the patient, and the safety and quality of the crowns or veneers is not guaranteed.
  4. Where is my money going?
    You can often answer this question by looking at the surroundings upon entering a dentist’s office. Is the furniture and décor modest and practical, or do you notice pricey fixtures and luxurious furniture? If you see an outdoor fountain in the entrance-way or even a koi pond greeting you as you walk in, you should know that you are probably paying for these amenities. You might take a moment to check for a parked Porsche or Alfa Romero nearby. This car might belong to your dentist.
  5. How much student debt does this cosmetic dentist carry?
    You may never have thought to ask this question of a dentist, but it is related to the one above. Student dept for a dental school graduate can range in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Rest assured they cover their costs to their creditors, and charge their patients accordingly.
  6. Just because your area’s lifestyle magazine features a cosmetic dentist, does that really mean he or she is the best?
    Finally, glossy lifestyle magazines published mostly for advertising local businesses and medical practices often feature full-page advertisements of a cosmetic dental practice. The implication is that this dentist is the best in the area. Remember that dentists pay money for this advertising. Research should always come before assumptions.

Searching for a cosmetic dentist

An internet search can also provide names of cosmetic dentists considered to be the best in their geographic area (for whatever reason). Our internet search resulted in the following names of “top” cosmetic dentists and practices referring to themselves as the best (or one of the best) in their cities.

  • Susan Hollar, DDS, Dallas, Texas
  • NY Center for Cosmetic Dentistry, New York City, New York
  • Matthew Chow, DDS, San Francisco, California
  • Banjamin Fiss, DDS, Chicago, Illinois
  • Mahnaz Rashti, DDS, Los Angeles, California (Beverly Hills)
  • Paul Freeman, DDS, Atlanta, GA

Who is the best dentist in the world?

Brighter Image Lab encourages anyone considering cosmetic dentistry to do their research on cosmetic dentists. Ask questions of the dentists themselves because you shouldn’t depend on persuasive advertising or even internet searches. Cosmetic dentists pay big money to ensure their practice appears at the top of web searches. If you consider the questions listed above, certainly what you learn might cause you to consider alternative cosmetic dental solutions.

Solutions like the stunning and authentic-looking BILVeneers provided by Brighter Image Lab. This affordable smile solution is an option that all who are considering any kind of cosmetic dentistry should know about. Brighter Image Lab veneers will make you smile, and keep you smiling for years to come.

Fix Your Smile Today - Learn More
Don't pay for a cosmetic dentist office! Get removable veneers from Brighter Image Lab instead!

One look at the lobby of any cosmetic dentist office will tell you where your money is going when paying for costly cosmetic dental procedures.

If the best way to hide something is in plain sight, you need look no further than the granite countertops, leather seating, gleaming hardwood floors, and public iPads in many cosmetic dentist offices. Often you don’t even have to open the door to a cosmetic dentist’s office to find these “necessities” for improving your smile. Dental offices are now sporting outdoor fountains and koi ponds that greet patients upon arrival, usually in the trendiest and most expensive real estate in town.

Luxurious surroundings like these fit the description of many cosmetic dental practices, which would explain why cosmetic dentistry has become an industry where the rich are paying the rich, since dental insurance does not cover most cosmetic dental procedures.

Don't pay for a cosmetic dentist office! Get removable veneers from Brighter Image Lab instead!
Don’t pay for a cosmetic dentist office! Get removable veneers from Brighter Image Lab instead!

Monopolized By Wealthy

Cosmetic dentistry has been monopolized by the wealthy in the same way that plastic surgery has been. It would be no surprise to anyone if a patient on her way to visit a cosmetic dentist strolled by her plastic surgeon’s office in the same posh professional building or high-end shopping district. Nobody would ever question the association of these like-minded physicians, both of whom are in the business of beautifying the beautiful.

The question though remains: Can people of lesser income ever afford a cosmetic solution to an unsightly set of teeth? Sadly, it’s disenfranchised segments of society for whom cosmetic dental procedures are most desperately needed. Low-income demographics contain the densest populations of people with serious needs for cosmetic dentistry. For these individuals too, an improved set of front teeth would make the most radical difference in their social and even economic elevation. Yet society has strongly told them – backed by the glitzy, glamorous image evoked by the cosmetic dental industry – that an improvement in their smile is as out-of-reach as owning Porsche, a yacht, a marble fountain, or having plastic surgery.

Cosmetic Dentists Keeping Up Appearances?

And if an affordable solution to an unsightly smile does exist, would an ordinary cosmetic dentist office provide it?  The answer to this question is two-part. First, an affordable cosmetic dental solution exists (removable dental veneers by Brighter Image Lab, brighterimagelab.com). Second, the everyday cosmetic dentist office does not provide it affordably. Keeping up pricey office surroundings and a glitzy public image is apparently more achievable with $10,000-$30,000 patients, not $1,000 patients.

Obviously the market for a more affordable smile solution is huge. We are taught from earliest youth to value the dental industry’s recommendations as the last and final word on teeth. This results in few people ever knowing about their options. Society then trusts these endorsements when the dental industry sports luxurious offices. Especially when they only provide suggestions that are in the tens and thousands of dollars. Most people believe a better smile is a privilege only for the rich. Most people, without even realizing it quietly and humbly accept the smile they end up with at adulthood.

Brighter Image Lab The Alternative to Cosmetic Dentists

Brighter Image Lab is an online dental lab operating out of a small but functional building near downtown Fort Worth. They design and manufacture state-of-the-art, custom-made, snap-on, removable dental veneers at a fraction of the price of conventional cosmetic dentistry. The result is both natural-looking and stunning.

A set of upper veneers from Brighter Image Lab starts at $795 and can be paid in two installments. The veneers fit over the original teeth resulting in a beautiful set of natural looking teeth – a near perfect smile.

Upon placing an order for veneers, clients receive a kit for making their own impressions (which is very easy). Once the lab receives these impressions, the custom design process begins with CAD technology and finishes building the custom veneers.

Hand polishing completes a perfect, natural looking set of veneers that only the wearer would know is not original teeth. “Smile Specialists” are only a phone call away to help with making impressions or ordering. They can also answer any questions for clients adjusting to a new set of veneers.

Skip the Cosmetic Dentist Office and Buy Lab Direct

Compare this simple, affordable solution to the tens of thousands of dollars charged by undergoing cosmetic dental work. The typical cosmetic dentist office should cut costs on their glamorous image and keep the money in their patients’ pockets. Otherwise, they can’t offer a dental veneer solution like Brighter Image Lab’s that’s affordable to a large majority of society.

It’s clear the average cosmetic dentist office is spending patients’ cash on luxurious office furnishings and expensive real estate. They should rather put the money “where the mouth is”. This excludes those needing a smile solution most from “the club.”

When you purchase a set of dental veneers from Brighter Image Lab, you’re doing more than purchasing an affordable smile solution. You’re giving a choice to those who need it most – those who wrongly believe they’d never have a perfect smile.

Fix Your Smile Today - Learn More
New Life Smile Makeover for 50 Year Old Mechanic

New Life Smile Makeover from Brighter Image Lab

Watch this amazing New Life Smile makeover for a 50 year old mechanic. This client lost his wife, then his smile. New Life Smile partner Brighter Image Lab was there to help him regain his smile, and give him a new life with a smile makeover.

I’ve never had the perfect storybook life, but Devin and me were at least happy. And together we always found a way to make things work. After she passed, I felt like I’d lost my reason to smile. Then eventually I lost my smile altogether.

My dental insurance company told me my issues were cosmetic, and yeah maybe I didn’t have any physical pain, but the life I was living sure hurt like hell. I knew my smile was holding me back but I was stuck and I just didn’t think I had any other choices.

That’s why what Brighter Image Lab did for me is so amazing. Now when I look in the mirror, I don’t just see a worn-out mechanic anymore. I see someone with a lot of life left to live. I see potential, and hope.

Brighter Image didn’t just change my smile. I think it’s safe to say they’ve truly changed my life.

Fix Your Smile Today - Learn More

This New Life Smile makeover was made possible by Brighter Image Lab. Located in Fort Worth, TX, Brighter Image Lab helps clients get a new life with a smile makeover all over the world in places like: Guangzhou, Shanghai, Chongqing, Beijing, Hangzhou, Tianjin, Xi’an, China;  Taipei, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Yokohama, Osaka, Nagoya, Sapporo, Kobe, Kyoto, Fukuoka, Kawasaki, Saitama, Japan; Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad, Chennal, Kolkata, Surat, India; Jakarta, Surabaya, Bandung, Indonesia; Manila, Quezon City, Davao, Malingao, Cebu City, Taguig, Pasig City, Philippines, and most areas in Asia and the Pacific Islands.

Snap-On Smile Review

Snap-On Smile Reviews and Frequently Asked Questions

In the suburbs of Chicago, from Skokie to Glenview to Wilmette to Northbrook, Snap-On Smile reviews and questions fuel debate regarding the effects and reliability of Snap-On Smile vs. traditional porcelain veneers.

As a result, Chicago dentist, Dr. William Cohen, this #Chicago cosmetic dentist works to clarify the answers to many of the most troubling questions posed by possible Snap-On Smile and Lumineers clients. His expert opinion for questions ranging from Snap On Smile For 2 Missing Teeth to Snap-On Smile Reviews Online highlights some of the more puzzling aspects for folks in Chicago whose #SnapOnSmile broke and left them wondering what their options were.

Especially relevant, Dr. Cohen replies to the question:

Before you decide to invest in another Snap-On Smile, remember that a Snap-On Smile lasts longer when it is only used for special occasions or perhaps on the weekends. Everyday use will wear it out quickly.

Curated from Chicago Cosmetic Dental

Problems With Veneers

In fact, most dentists will quickly explain that the Snap-On Smile should be worn for “special occasions” because they want their clients to purchase the permanent porcelain veneers. However, even Dr. Cohen had to contend with a question regarding problems with traditional veneers from a client who now wanted to cover them up with a Snap-On Smile. Sandy, on Dr. Cohen’s blog, wishes she could go back to a Snap-On Smile because of problems with her veneers.

have been wanting to do something about my smile for years. Most of the research I did was about the snap on smile so that’s what I told my dentist I wanted. He convinced me to get veneers instead because they look better and last longer. I got 8 veneers and they do look better but they are not really lasting. I just got the veneers in November and one of them fell off twice. Now another veneer looks loose. If I had a snap on smile it would be done and I wouldn’t have these problems. I should not have let my dentist convince me to get veneers. Can I get a snap on smile over the veneers? I would definitely get them from a different dentist this time. I don’t want to be talked into something I don’t want again. Thank you. Sandy

Curated from Can I Get A Snap On Smile Over My Veneers?

A Temporary Removable Veneer

At Brighter Image Lab, we have long-contended that the Press On Veneer is not a substitute for natural teeth. While some dentists claim that the Snap-On Smile is a fix for missing teeth, we’ve yet to see a dentist that could actually bill your dental insurance company for a Snap-On Smile and declare it a replacement for teeth. It does not restore teeth, and it does not replace them. Perhaps the most humorous, and the most accurate description of the purpose of a Snap-On Smile comes from another dental blog that compares the Snap-On Smile to a wig:

[Snap-On Smile] perfect for special occasions, or even worn daily. I got a little chuckle out of watching this infomercial. This appliance reminds me of someone bald or with thinning hair fitted for a wig. Is Snap-on Smile a good alternative over permanent procedures that involve cosmetic dentistry?

Curated from Does the Snap On Smile Really Improve Your Smile?

How Does Press On Veneers Compare to Snap-On Smile Reviews?

A convenient, removable, reversible answer to achieving the appearance of a beautiful smile, Press On Veneers allows you to be comfortable with your smile in a social setting without changing your teeth. Brighter Image Lab merged technology and software to create a Snap-On Smile alternative for people who have spent years hiding their smiles. Call today and ask Laurie Hall about financing Press On Veneers to make self-help for your smile more affordable.

Is the Creative Diagnosis by a Texas Dentist really a ripoff?

My household’s level of confidence in dentistry is at an all-time low due to creative diagnosis. About six months ago, my Texas dentist informed me that my “bunny teeth” were likely getting in the way of my professional success, a problem he could correct with a (pricey) cosmetic procedure.

If I let him fix my teeth, he told me, he was sure I would start “dressing better.” A few months later, my husband scheduled a basic cleaning with a new Texas Dentist.

Once they had him in the chair and looked at his teeth, they informed him that the regular cleaning wouldn’t do at all: He would need to reschedule for an $800 deep cleaning. Creative diagnosis? No thanks. I’d rather go to Tijuana to get dental veneers.

We were convinced we must look like suckers—until I came across an op-ed in ADANews, the official publication of the American Dental Association. The article, by longtime pediatric dentist Jeffrey Camm, described a disturbing trend he called creative diagnosis — the peddling of unnecessary treatments.

The Mystery of Creative Diagnostics by Dentists

William van Dyk, a Northern California dentist of 41 years, saw Camm’s op-ed and wrote in: “I especially love the patients that come in for second opinions after the previous dentist found multiple thousands of dollars in necessary treatment where nothing had been found six months earlier. And, when we look, there is nothing to diagnose.”

“In recent years, I have been seeing more and more creative diagnosis,” Camm told me when I called him at his practice in Washington state. A Texas dentist, he said, might think, “‘Well, the dental insurance covers this crown, so I’m not hurting this patient, so why don’t I just do it?’ That’s the absolutely wrong approach.”

Poking around, I found plenty of services catering to Texas dentists hoping to increase their incomes. One lecturer at a privately operated seminar called The Profitable Dentist ($389) aimed to help “dentists to reignite their passion for dentistry while increasing their profit and time away from the office.”

Is the ADA Perpetuating Creative Diagnosing?

Even the ADA’s 2014 annual conference offered tips for maximizing revenue: “Taking time to help our patients want what we know they need,” notes one session description, “can drive the economic and reward engine of our practice.” Could this be the source of creative diagnosis?

Do you think you’ve been the victim of “creative diagnosis” from any of these dentists?

Name

Website

Phone

Address

Rodolfo “Rudy” G. Ramos Jr., D.D.S., P.C.http://www.rudyramosdds.com/

(713) 973-9591

9545 Katy Freeway, Ste. 125, Houston, Texas, 77024
Steven Austin, D.D.S.http://drsteveaustin.com

(806) 358-7646

2815 South Georgia, Amarillo, Texas, 79109
Tamela L. Gough, D.D.S., M.S.http://www.allenkidsdentist.com/

(972) 727-0737

201 N Alma Dr Ste 100, Allen, Texas, 75013
James W. Chancellor, D.D.S.

(210) 653-4410

4952 Windsor Hill, Suite 201, San Antonio, Texas, 78239
D. Bradley Dean, D.D.S.http://www.ntxpa.com/

(972) 964-2900

3900 American Drive, Suite 101, Plano , Texas, 75075
Christie Leedy, D.D.Shttp://www.abilenedental.com/

(325) 692-3344

5309 Buffalo Gap Rd, Abilene, Texas, 79606
Kirby Bunel Jr., D.D.S.http://www.texarkanacosmeticdentistry.com/

(903) 794-3331

1701 Moores Lane, Texarkana, Texas, 75503
Dr. Mark Peppard, DDShttp://www.pepdds.com/

(512) 835-9557

4005 Spicewood Springs Road, Building C, Ste 500, Austin, Texas, 78759
Dr. Jennifer Bonehttp://hillcountrydentalassociates.com/

(830) 257-3000

710 Hill Country Dr #1, Kerrville, Texas, 78028
Dr. Donna Miller, DDShttp://creekwooddentalarts.com/

(254) 772-3632

7911 Woodway Drive, Waco, Texas, 76712
Dr. Ronald Rheahttp://www.dentistsattcv.com/rhea.html

(713) 467-3458

791 Town & Country Blvd Suite 222, Houston, Texas, 77024
Dr. Craig Armstrong, DDShttp://www.craigarmstrongdds.com/

(832) 251-1234

10370 Richmond Avenue, Suite 780, Houston, Texas, 77042

Upselling in dentistry isn’t a new phenomenon, but it’s having a moment. One reason: Texas Dental school tuition—and debt—has doubled since the ’90s.

Is High Debt Causing Creative Diagnosis by a Texas Dentist?

According to the American Dental Education Association, students who graduated in 1996 were in the hole $112,000 (in 2013 dollars), on average, while 2013 grads were a whopping $215,000 in debt—28 percent were on the hook for $300,000 or more.

By contrast, the average med school grad owed $170,000. ADEA executive director Richard Valachovic explained that one reason dental schools have jacked up tuitions is the rising costs of technology for student labs.

In any case, a generation ago, newly hatched Texas dentists would join established practices as modestly paid associates, with the promise of eventually becoming partners. But these days, with dentists retiring later, there’s less turnover in private practice tempting new dentists to forgo dental care and engage in creative diagnosis.

Are Dental Chains Asking Dentists to Diagnose Creatively?

Instead, more and more young dentists are taking jobs with chains, many of which set revenue quotas for practitioners. This has created some legal backlash: In 2012, for example, 11 patients sued (PDF) a 450-office chain called Aspen Dental, claiming that its model turns dentists into salespeople.

Some corporate dentists appear to have crossed the line into fraud. In 2010, Small Smiles, a venture-capital-owned chain with offices in 20 states, was ordered to refund $24 million to the government after an investigation found that its dentists had been performing unnecessary extractions, fillings, and root canals on children covered by Medicaid. Could these corporations be the reason behind creative diagnosis?

A new lawsuit alleges that some toddlers it treated underwent as many as 14 procedures—often under restraint and without anesthesia. (The group was banned from Medicaid this year.) Several other pediatric dentistry chains have been sued as a result of similar allegations.

Advice for Creative Diagnostic Attempts by Your Dentist

So how can you spot creative diagnosis when you go for your next cleaning? First, beware of specials: That laser dentistry and whitening package may be a ploy to get you in the door so the practice can upsell you on more-profitable procedures.

Van Dyk also advises caution if your Texas dentist insists on replacing old fillings or recommends crowns instead of fillings. And look out for excessive X-rays: The ADA says healthy patients need a full set (14 to 22) every two years at the most.

If your Texas dentist recommends a special “cone-beam” X-ray, get a second opinion. Along with a 3-D picture of your mouth, it delivers radiation up to 18X that of a traditional dental X-ray.

Radiation experts worry that some Texas dentists are substituting FDA approved cone-beam scanners for a standard X-ray.

Dealing with Creative Diagnosis in Pediatrics by a Texas Dentist

Finally, when it comes to children’s dentists, make sure to find a board-certified pediatric specialist. Not all dentists that cater to children have special training.

The practitioners I spoke to were quick to add that even dubious-sounding treatments are in some cases medically necessary, and not necessarily creative diagnosis.

In conclusion, if your gut says your dentist is going overboard on treatment, get a second opinion. “Will you have to pay a little more for another consult?” Camm asks. “Sure. But it could end up saving you a whole lot more in the long run.”

Curated from Is Your Dentist Ripping You Off? | Mother Jones

Bad teeth in a rich dentist world is shameful

Have a mouthful of poor teeth shaped by a childhood in poverty? Don’t go knocking on the door of a Rich Dentist.

I am bone of the bone of them that live in trailer homes. We grew up next to Tiffany ‘Pennsatucky’ Doggett, the hostile former drug addict from the prison TV drama Orange Is the New Black. You know her by her poor teeth.

Pennsatucky – a scrappy slip of a woman menacing, beating and proselytising to fellow inmates – stole the show during the first season of the Netflix prison series. But amid an ensemble cast of similarly riveting, dangerous characters, it was her grey, jagged poor teeth that shocked viewers into repulsed fixation. She was the villain among villains, a monster that fans loved to hate; ‘Pennsatucky teeth’ became a pejorative in social media.

Bad teeth in a rich dentist world is shameful

America’s first glimpse of poor teeth

Actress Taryn Manning’s gnarly, prosthetic teeth startled viewers because, by and large, poor characters in TV and film are played by actors whose whitened, straightened, veneered smiles aren’t covered up. It’s hard to think of characters besides Pennsatucky through whom heinous teeth convey rather than lampoon the physicality of the poor. The first that comes to mind is the derelict serial killer in a movie actually called Monster (2003); as with Manning, Charlize Theron’s Oscar-winning transformation generated astonishment with fake teeth.

In my life, Pennsatucky and her poor teeth are entirely familiar. She’s the slurring aunt who passed out in our farm’s swimming pool while babysitting me, and later stole my mom’s wedding band to buy the drugs that dug grooves in her cheeks. She’s the step-parent whose brain, organs and teeth corroded over the years and now lives in a mobile-home park with my construction-worker dad.

But Pennsatucky’s teeth aren’t just ‘meth teeth.’ They are the teeth of poor folk, of the young grandma who helped to raise me and for decades worked from diner to factory line to a desk job as a probation officer for the county court system in Wichita, Kansas. She was just 35 when I was born, so I knew her as a radiant thing; at the downtown courthouse, where I tagged along – babysitters are expensive – attorneys turned flirtatious near her green eyes, long limbs and shiny, natural-blonde bob. Then at night, in her farmhouse or the tiny brick house we fixed up in a rough Wichita neighborhood, I watched her take out her teeth, scrub them with a rough brush, and drop them into a cup of water with a fizzy tablet.

Prevention isn’t enough to save teeth

‘Brush your teeth and don’t eat too much candy,’ she’d tell me. ‘You don’t want to end up like Grandma.’ She’d widen her eyes and pop her dentures forward so that they bulged from her lips, sending me giggling. In the early 1970s, a rich dentist had pried every one of her teeth, too far gone or too expensive to save, from her 20-something skull. She’s 69 now and has worn false teeth for more than 40 years.

‘I had poor teeth all my life. They were straight and looked OK, but I always had toothaches,’ she tells me when I ask how she ended up with dentures. As I was growing up, the story fluctuated – she was in a car accident, her natural teeth just fell out, and so on. ‘I was excited to have them, knowing I would never have another toothache. Now I think it was pretty stupid, but at the time it was really painful, and I thought I was doing the right thing.’

Poor Teeth is Social Warfare

More than 126 million people in the US – nearly half the population – had no dental coverage in 2012, according to the US National Association of Dental Plans. In 2007, the New York State Dental Journal reported that while only one-tenth of general physician costs were paid out of pocket, nearly half of all dental costs were settled directly by patients. This reflects spending by the uninsured but also those sharing costs with coverage providers; most plans cover routine cleanings but leave patients to pay for 20 to 50 per cent of fillings, crowns and other big-ticket visits. For those who can’t afford to pay that difference, treatment is delayed and poor teeth continue to degrade.

But expense isn’t the only barrier to dental care. Those on Medicaid find that few rich dentists participate in the program due to its low payout. And more than 45 million people in the US live in areas, often rural or impoverished, with rich dentist shortages, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services. Medicare, as a general rule, doesn’t include dental.

In the past year, the Affordable Care Act, or ‘ObamaCare’, has changed many lives for the better – mine included. But its omission of dental coverage, a result of political compromise, is a dangerous, absurd compartmentalization of health care, as though teeth are apart from and less important than the rest of the body.

It wasn’t sugar that guided our dental fates. And it wasn’t meth. It was lack of insurance, lack of knowledge, lack of good nutrition.

Dental care isn’t available to many

About a decade ago, at the age of 50, my dad almost died when infection from an abscessed tooth poisoned his blood and nearly stopped his heart. He has never had dental insurance and has seen a rich dentist only a handful of times when some malady became unbearable. In 2009, according to the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, dental issues caused about 936,000 emergency-room visits and almost 13,000 inpatient hospital stays. Many of these patients had low incomes and dental coverage that restricted care to emergencies or wasn’t accepted by accessible dentists.

‘I notice people’s teeth because mine are so bad,’ Dad tells me during a break from a side job renovating a fraternity house. He has long been the handsome object of crushes, but his teeth have become increasingly askew with time, one of his eye teeth now ragged and long like a rabbit’s for lack of a carrot to file it down. ‘Nutrition affects teeth, right?’

I point out that Gatorade, which he favors when he splurges on a bottled beverage, is full of sugar. But it wasn’t sugar, heaps of which are sucked down daily by the middle and upper classes, that guided his and my grandma’s dental fates. And it wasn’t meth. It was lack of insurance, lack of knowledge, lack of good nutrition – poverties into which much of the country was born.

The poor endure undue criticism

My family’s distress over our teeth – what food might hurt or save them, whether having them pulled was a mistake – reveals the psychological hell of having poor teeth in a rich, capitalist country: the underprivileged are priced out of the dental-treatment system yet perversely held responsible for their dental condition. It’s a familiar trick in the privatization-happy US – like, say, underfunding public education and then criticizing the institution for struggling. Often, the conditions of teeth are blamed solely on the habits and choices of their owners, and for the poor therein lies an undue shaming.

‘Don’t get fooled by those mangled teeth she sports on camera!’ says the ABC News host introducing the woman who plays Pennsatucky. ‘Taryn Manning is one beautiful and talented actress.’ This suggestion that poor teeth and talent, in particular, are mutually exclusive betrays our broad, unexamined bigotry toward those long known, tellingly, as ‘white trash.’ It’s become less acceptable in recent decades to make racist or sexist statements, but blatant classism generally goes unchecked. See the hugely successful blog People of Walmart that, through submitted photographs, viciously ridicules people who look like contemporary US poverty: the elastic waistbands and jutting stomachs of diabetic obesity, the wheelchairs and oxygen tanks of gout and emphysema.

Class warfare knows no boundaries

Upper-class supremacy is nothing new. A hundred years ago, the US Eugenics Records Office not only targeted racial minorities but ‘sought to demonstrate scientifically that large numbers of rural poor whites were genetic defectives,’ as the sociologist Matt Wray explains in his book Not Quite White: White Trash and the Boundaries of Whiteness (2006). The historian and civil rights activist W E B du Bois, an African American, wrote in his autobiography Dusk of Dawn (1940) that, growing up in Massachusetts in the 1870s, ‘the racial angle was more clearly defined against the Irish than against me. It was a matter of income and ancestry more than color.’ Martin Luther King, Jr made similar observations and was organizing a poor-people’s march on Washington at the time of his murder in 1968.

Such marginalization can make you either demonize the system that shuns you or spurn it as something you never needed anyway. When I was a kid and no one in the family had medical or dental insurance, Dad pointed out that those industries were criminal – a sweeping analysis that, whether accurate or not, suggested we were too principled to support the racket rather than too poor to afford it.

A bad smile leads to bullying

My baby teeth were straight and white, and I wasn’t obese – an epidemic among poor kids that hadn’t yet taken hold in the 1980s – but I had plenty of ‘tells’: crooked bangs, trimmed at home with sewing shears; a paper grocery sack carrying my supplies on the first day of school while other kids wore unicorn backpacks. A near-constant case of ringworm infection (I kept a jar of ointment on my nightstand year-round).

The smell of cigarette smoke on my clothes, just as cigarettes were falling out of favor with the middle and upper classes. Sometimes, ill-fitting clothes, as when the second-grade teacher I revered looked at my older cousin’s shirt sagging off my shoulder and said: ‘Tell your mother to send you to school in clothes that fit you.’

In fifth grade, a girl noticed my generic, plastic-smelling, too-pointy boots – a Kmart version of the black leather lace-ups that were in fashion – and for weeks hounded me before and after school, kicking dirt on my shins and calling me Pippi Longstocking.

I had moments of cool clothes and good haircuts, too, and I was a confident child who earned friends and accolades. But I still think of the boy who handed me a dessert cup from his lunch box every day when a mix-up in the free-lunch program left me without a meal card for months.

He pulled from my skull the greyed tooth, cracked perfectly down the middle.

Common throughout those years was a pulsing throb in my gums, a shock wave up a root when biting down, a headache that agitated me in classrooms. While they looked OK, my baby teeth were cavity-ridden. Maybe it was the soy formula in my bottle when they were growing in, or the sugary cereals to which my brain later turned for dopamine production in a difficult home. Maybe it was because our water supply, whether from a rural well or the Wichita municipal system, wasn’t fluoridated. But richer teeth faced the same challenges. The primary reason my mouth hurt was lack of money.

Tooth loss takes am emotional toll

Once, around third grade, an upper molar that had menaced beyond all – the worst toothache I ever had – finally rotted so thoroughly that it cracked in half while still in my jaw. Mom took me to the rich dentist, somehow. The pain was tremendous, he explained, because the pulpy nerve at the tooth’s center was exposed. He pulled from my skull the greyed tooth, cracked perfectly down the middle, and let me take it home. For years, I kept the two pieces in a tiny jewellery box, sometimes taking them out and joining them like interlocking sides of the heart-shaped friendship necklaces I coveted.

Around that time, I had my jaw X-rayed for the first time. The results were grim.

‘You might as well start saving for braces right now,’ my mom recalls the rich dentist saying. We were at the outset of a post-divorce period that would include much moving and a slew of partial-coverage dental insurance plans: employer-based, which would be cancelled with Mom’s regular job switches, and variations on state-funded, poor-kid programs in between. Each time the policy changed, Mom had to find a new rich dentist who would accept our coverage. Then we’d ride out a waiting period before scheduling a cleaning or filling. My dental records were often lost in this shuffle, as was the case with my general health files in doctors’ offices and school districts – I got a new round of shots just about every year for lack of immunization records on file.

There would, of course, be no saving for braces.

It took years to find out whether the X-raying dentist’s pessimistic prediction would come true. My baby teeth were slow to fall out, their replacements slow to grow in. But at some point came the unequivocal, surprising verdict: my teeth grew in straight.

I don’t just mean straight enough, I mean 99th-percentile straight, I mean dentists call hygienists over to take a look.

‘Doesn’t she have pretty teeth?’ they say, my mouth under hot lamps. ‘Are you sure you didn’t have braces? But you whiten them, right?’

I shake my head no and in the dentist’s chair tingle with the bliss of gratitude. That my environment and genes somehow conspired to shake out a bright, orderly smile is a blessing I can’t explain. But I can tell you what preserved the blessing: me.

Following all of the rules

When a health teacher said brush your teeth twice a day, I brushed my teeth twice a day. When a TV commercial imparted that rich dentists recommend flossing daily, I flossed daily. A college room-mate once remarked on the fervor of my dental regimen. After boozy nights, when other kids were passing out, I held on, stumbled to the bathroom and squeezed paste onto a brush. However tired, however drunk, I scrubbed every side of every tooth, uncoiled a waxed string and threaded it into sacred spaces.

Privileged America judges harshly the mouths that chew orange Doritos, drink yellow Mountain Dew, breathe with a sawdust rattle.

The cycle of poor teeth continues

A bad smile, I knew, beget not just shame but more poorness: people with a bad smile have a harder time getting jobs and other opportunities. People without jobs are poor. Poor people can’t access dentistry – and so goes the cycle.

If Pennsatucky ever gets out of poverty, it will be thanks in part to a prison-yard fight in the season-one finale, when the upper-class protagonist knocks out her nasty grill; early in the second season, her rotten gums nearly toothless, she blackmails the warden into a new set of teeth. Upon incarceration, Pennsatucky traded meth for ‘born-again’ religious fanaticism, but her new teeth are a harbinger of a more substantive rebirth. If the eyes are the soul’s windows, its door is the mouth – the fence across which pass food, drink, words, our very breath.

Privileged America, ever striving for organic purity, judges harshly the mouths that chew orange Doritos, drink yellow Mountain Dew, breathe with a sawdust rattle, carry a lower lip’s worth of brown chaw, use dirty words and bad grammar. When Pennsatucky gets out of prison, she’ll need respect, rehabilitation, employment. To that end, for all her praying and testifying, Pennsatucky’s pearly gates might be her pearly, albeit prosthetic, whites. She cries with joy in a prison van on the way to get them, and later shows off with an over-the-top smile during laundry duty.

‘You’re acting a little, like, retarded,’ an envious inmate tells her.

‘I’m not retarded,’ she says. ‘I got new teeth!’

The emotional effects of poor teeth

When I was a young adult, I learnt I’d been born without wisdom teeth. The dentist told me I was ‘evolutionarily advanced’ since human beings, no longer in the business of tearing raw flesh from mastodon bones, don’t need so many teeth now. So many TV shows, bad jokes and bucktoothed hillbilly costumes in Halloween aisles had suggested that my place of origin made me ‘backwards’, primitive and uncivilised, that the dentist’s comment struck me deeply, just as in fourth grade when I read the word ‘genius’ in a school psychologist’s evaluation notes to my mother and wept on the sidewalk.

Having straddled a class divide and been wrongly stereotyped on both sides of it, throughout my life I’ve found peace in the places and things that don’t evaluate my status: nature, animals, art, books. ‘I sit with Shakespeare,’ wrote du Bois in The Souls of Black Folk (1903), ‘and he winces not.’ Social disadvantage and hazard engender what he called ‘double consciousness’, the ever-present awareness of more than one self. For du Bois, his most challenging two-ness in the wake of slavery was to be educated and black – a tension of socialisation still at work, to be sure, as President Barack Obama’s raw first memoir attests. Today, for me and millions of people in the US living on one side of a historic income gap, the defining double consciousness is to be educated and poor.

You can’t escape your class

The latter, for many of those who suffered losses after the economic collapse of 2008, is a terrifying new identity, its horror projected on to Pennsatucky’s serrated mouth and hard to reconcile with the Americans they thought they were. But in my academic and professional ‘climbing’, I learnt early and often that one doesn’t leave a place, class or culture and enter another, but rather holds the privilege and burden of many narratives simultaneously.

Friends who know my background sometimes kid me when I’m drunk and misconjugate a verb or slip into a drawl, or when, thoroughly sober, I reveal a gross blind spot in the realm of book-learning (if, say, the question involves whatever one learns in sixth grade, most of which I spent playing in red dirt outside a two-room schoolhouse near the Oklahoma state line). They smile at the pleasure I take in scoring solid furniture from yard sales or, once, for expressing delight over a tiny cast-iron skillet, a miniature version of the pan my grandma once used to fight a drunken stepfather off her mother. I enjoy the kidding and feel appreciated when they recognize the true clichés that weave my story.

Mis-education knows no class

But here’s the thing: wealthy people use cast-iron skillets and bad grammar, too. It’s just not their narrative and thus passes without remark. I’ve observed fellow journalists, the same ones who made trailer-park tornado survivors famous for a loose grip on the past participle, edit dumb-sounding quotes by city commissioners to suit the speaker’s stature.

And while I took the education I wasn’t given through libraries, encyclopedias and my former stepfather’s New Yorker subscription, plenty of members of the middle and upper classes refuse or lack the ability to seize the opportunities handed them.

It can be useful to acknowledge the cultural forces that carve us, or edifying to indulge in the tropes of our assigned narratives, but true distinctions of character, intelligence, talent and skill exist at the level of the individual, not of the class – or the ethnicity, the gender, the sexual orientation, the religion and so on. To claim otherwise, as we’ve discovered across time and countless persecutions of our own doing, is at best an insult and at worst an excuse for enslavement and genocide.

The liberal proponents of Occupy Wall Street are often the same people who think Southerners are inbred and Walmart shoppers slovenly miscreants.

Your social position follows you

In Thomas Harris’s best-selling crime-novel series, the FBI consults the imprisoned serial killer and mastermind psychiatrist Hannibal Lecter in its search for ‘the Tooth Fairy’, a family-slayer who bites his victims with dentures made from a mould of his grandmother’s distorted, razor-sharp teeth. Years after that manhunt, the FBI again turns to Lecter for help; this time, the refined sociopath – a former philharmonic orchestra board member and mannerly purveyor of his victims’ flesh – finds it more interesting to analyze the agent than the latest case.

‘You know what you look like to me, with your good bag and your cheap shoes?’ he asks the young agent Clarice Starling – who comes from the same place as Pennsatucky but whose intellect, health, grit and ambition, presumably, landed her on the right side of the prison bars. ‘You look like a rube. A well-scrubbed, hustling rube with a little taste. Good nutrition’s given you some length of bone, but you’re not more than one generation from poor white trash, are you, Agent Starling? And that accent you’ve tried so desperately to shed: pure West Virginia. What is your father, dear? Is he a coal miner?’

Take a good look at yourself

Lecter’s condescending soliloquy from a cell decorated with sketches of the Duomo cathedral in Florence – a place Starling surely hadn’t heard of when she left her family sheep farm for the FBI Academy at Quantico – hits home but doesn’t derail her. His most famous line – the aggressive posturing about fava beans and good Italian wine – happens when Starling sends a psychological evaluation through the glass and tells him to look at his damn self. We should do the same in the US, where the liberal proponents of Occupy Wall Street are often the same people who think Southerners are inbred and Walmart shoppers slovenly miscreants with no social awareness.

A century ago, du Bois wrote: ‘The problem of the 20th century is the problem of the colour line.’ The problem of the 21st century is that of the class line. For the American Dream to put its money where its mouth is, we need not just laws ensuring, say, universal dental care, but individual awareness of the judgments we pass on people whose bad smile – or clothes, waist lines, grocery carts, or limps – represent our worst nightmares.

The Decline of Dental Care in America

Picture the ideal “American dream” family. A father with a job that pays well, a nurturing mother, and their 2.5 children. This family has the time and money to schedule all of their necessary dental care.

In this reality, the father’s job probably has excellent benefits that include dental insurance. The mother will take the children to their dentist appointments. The children grow up with the assurance of regular dental care. The kind of care that provides braces to fix any issues with their smile.

This upper middle-class family with already perfect teeth easily makes the recommended bi-annual trips to the dentist for upkeep. Unfortunately, this is not an actuality for the majority of families. Many poor and lower-middle-class families do not receive adequate dental care, in part because most dentists want customers who can pay cash or have private insurance.

This prevalent problem raises the following question. Is the dentist in the habit of helping people, or in the business of making money? Look at the following statistics and decide for yourself.

The Cost of Dental Care in America

Rising dentist incomes reflect the lack of dental care for those who can't afford it

Dentist fees have risen much faster than inflation. In real dollars, the cost of the average dentist procedure rose 25% from 1996 to 2004.

In addition, dentists’ incomes have grown much faster than that of the typical worker. American dentists in general practice made an average salary of $164,570 in 2012. In contrast, the average salary among the general public was $51,017 that same year.

Average household income can't afford dental care

The American Dental Association believes this imbalance comes from a shortage of dentists. However, we believe the true problem stems from dentists unwillingness to practice in areas where they are needed.

Dentists have a disproportionate presence in affluent suburbs. However, those who are most in need of care are concentrated in inner cities and rural communities. As many as 130 million Americans do not have dental insurance coverage. Some of those have to use Medicaid to even gain access to dental care.

The State of Dental Care in America

Unfortunately, only about 20% of the nation’s practicing dentists provide care to people with Medicaid. Of those who do, only a small percentage primarily serve the poor, chronically ill, or rural communities.

The “typical” family referenced earlier is merely a fantasy for the majority of hard-working people. Taking care of a family doesn’t afford regular dental visits, much less any sort of cosmetic dentistry.

Those who can afford dental care don’t need it. Those who need dental care can’t afford it, and as a result, may be in desperate need of a dentist.

Affordable Dental Choices are Available

Brighter Image Lab is providing an affordable dental choice with their Press On Veneers since 2010, and BILVeneers just introduced in 2017.

Press On Veneers by Brighter Image Lab

Nearly 10 years ago, we began creating new Press On Veneers ™ for our clients. Since then we helped thousands of smiles transition from bad to beautiful. Keep reading to learn how!

What are Press On Veneers?

At Brighter Image Lab, we believe that everyone has the right to a bright, beautiful smile. We took our lab-direct business model and developed a unique process to give our clients the smile they deserve at a greatly reduced price.

Using advanced technology, our design team and lab technicians work to create custom-veneers for each individual client. New Press On Veneers ™ are a single piece made from a unique composite resin that fit over the front 10 – 12 teeth on the top and 6 – 8 teeth on the bottom. They ensure that teeth are covered when talking or smiling.

Why is our business necessary?

Press On Veneers by Brighter Image Lab

Unfortunately, not everyone has access to regular dental care. More than 47 million people in the United States live in “dental health shortage areas”. As many as 130 million Americans don’t have dental insurance.

Frankly, dentists are not doing their part to help those in need, and someone needs to step up to help. While the number of businesses offering dental insurance has continued to fall, the cost of a visit to the dentist has risen rapidly.

People with chipped, cracked, missing, or misaligned teeth need a solution that won’t cost them several thousand dollars, and we are happy to be able to offer that to them.

Brighter Image Lab is a dental laboratory that deals directly with the public. We bypass a dentist visit in order to craft custom-made veneers for a fraction of what they would spend otherwise.

Are New Press On Veneers ™ right for everyone?

Many people are good candidates for New Press On Veneers ™. In order to qualify, a client must have four natural teeth on the target arch (top or bottom).

The veneers grip onto the back of existing teeth. They hold to the teeth by the mouth’s natural suction. Once in place, the tongue cannot move the veneers, and there is no need for any glue or dental adhesive.

Can I get Press On Veneers at home?

Yes! In fact, we only sell Press On Veneers online, lab direct. This means you never have to see a “Press On Veneers dentist” because they don’t exist. You can’t find the best Press On Veneers on Amazon or eBay, but right here on our website.

We design Press On Veneers top and bottom at our lab, but we ship them all over the world. You never have to worry whether you can find Press On Veneers near me because we are near everyone. We deliver the same Press On Veneers in the UK that we deliver to the Tampa, Florida.

Are there any reviews?

Clients ask us all the time where they can read a Press On Veneers review. There are a select few under the order area of our website, but the vast majority of reviews Press On Veneers have garnered can be found on Google Reviews.

Brighter Image Lab’s reviews have greatly improved since we first started making them. In fact, there were many complaints which clients still find and read today. Like most product launches, we did experience a rough start. We are continually looking to improve our products and services though, and we now have between and 4-5 star rating on Google Reviews, and new reviews are rolling in all the time!

How do I get Press On Veneers?

When you’re ready to place your order you can visit our website by clicking the Dental Veneers link in the header. Our website has a slider of hundreds of Press On Veneers before and after photos, a full list of pricing for New Press On Veneers ™, all of our information, how-to videos, and more.

We know clients are always looking for a Press On Veneers coupon code or asking when the next Press On Veneer sale is. We never want to sell them cheap because we feel like we would begin to sacrifice quality for price. The amount Press On veneers costs covers our expenses for making this custom fit veneer and allows us to continue to innovate these veneers. This ensures when you order, you always get the very best product available.

#BrighterImageLab was founded in 1997 by Director Bil Watson. The company began as teeth whitening business, but eventually realized there were needs that weren’t being addressed. People were unhappy with their smile because of more than just slight discoloration. Their Bilistic Tooth Polisher is the newest teeth cleaning product and has been a hot seller on Amazon and other online retail outlets.

Because of our lab-direct system we are able to serve clients all over the world. Contact us with questions or give us a call at 1-888-257-2455.