Tag Archives: dental care

What is fluorosis?

You have most likely heard about fluoride at some point in your life… and how dentists claim that it “strengthens” your teeth and “minimizes cavities”. Have you ever heard about fluorosis?

How much do you really know about fluoride?

Is it safe?

How much fluoride is too much?

Well, the scary truth is that any amount of fluoride has the power to harm you. Here’s why:

FLUORIDE IS COMPLETELY TOXIC.

Let’s first take a look at what fluoride is and then the horrible dangers it poses to your health and wellness.

What is Fluoride?

Fluoride is a mineral in your teeth and bones and is found naturally in water, soil, plants, rocks, and air. It is also synthetically produced and added to drinking water, toothpaste, mouthwash, and other chemical products.

When it comes to your health, fluoride is primarily used to “improve” dental care because it is thought to strengthen the enamel of the teeth.

However, the scary truth is that much of the water supply in the USA is still fluoridated. Plus you get additional exposure from dental products, meaning you are constantly subjected to FLUOROSIS!

What causes fluorosis?

You can find fluoride both naturally and artificially in water. By the time we account for concentrated, fluoridated dental products and materials, it’s not hard for the average person to unintentionally (or intentionally!) consume too much fluoride:

Fluoride consumed at elevated levels is know to have seriously detrimental effects on the human body.

It’s important to note that off-the-shelf oral hygiene products suggested by dentist offices typically contribute to the excessive ingestion of fluoride:

  • In a large data collection effort regarding fluoride poisoning, the American Association of Poison Control (AAPC). determined that toothpaste ingestion was the main source of fluoride toxicity. Other likely culprits are mouthwashes and supplements.
  • Over 80% of the cases of fluoride toxicity reported, were in children under the age of 6. They found children of this age group ingest more toothpaste than ‘recommended’ because their swallowing reflex hasn’t completely developed.

When you consume too much fluoride, it harms your overall health and can cause a variety of problems, such as:

  • Dental Fluorosis: A dental term that describes the developmental disturbance in regards to the enamel. It is not a disease, but rather a cosmetic condition. Consuming  fluoride is especially concerning during the years when the teeth are developing, typically up to age 8.

These conditions are highly alarming and you should take every precaution possible to keep you and your family safe.

Where should you start? Look no further than your drinking water…

Fluorosis From Water: Are You Drinking Too Much Fluoride?

There is a plethora of information and research that shows the dangerous side effects of using fluoride. On the other hand, there are very few studies that show any significant benefits from drinking water containing fluoride.

Water fluoridation is an extremely controversial topic. Some view it as a public health measure, while others consider it an example of mass, systemic poisoning.

That extreme view isn’t unfounded, considering fluoridated water accounts for 40% of all dental fluorosis cases. We consume these (sometimes) dangerous levels of fluoride via drinking water, children’s formula, or foods prepared with public drinking water

This is a simple case of “You better be safe than sorry” and keep you and your family safe by avoiding fluoride. Follow these simple safety tips:

  • Drinking filtered and purified water
  • Using a homemade or all natural fluoride free toothpaste
  • Making a fluoride free mouthwash

The key takeaway to always remember when it comes to fluoride toxicity is:

Regulating the amount of fluoride you consume is crucial to your overall health.

Better yet, your safest bet is to avoid fluoride altogether.

Do you or someone you know have fluorosis? Are you concerned that Fluoride in water is staining your teeth? Would you like a solution that doesn’t require a dentist visit and saves you 70%*?

Learn more about Brighter Image Lab’s amazing removable dental veneers: Press On Veneers, BILVeneers, and IncrediBIL Veneers.

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Brown stains on teeth is one of the possible effects of Fluorosis

Brown stains on teeth (tooth discoloration) is an aesthetic problem that is linked to a variety of causes.

These unsightly brown spots and stains are often a source of embarrassment and can damage not only your teeth, but your self esteem as well

Brown stains on teeth is one of the possible effects of Fluorosis

The absolute number one facial feature is your SMILE!

While poor dental care or eating certain foods can affect the appearance of teeth, what could be truly causing these stains may be lurking in your tap water, TOOTHPASTE, and mouthwash.

Yes, really!

So wait… products that are meant to HELP your teeth could actually be harming them?

It’s true.

The reason is that many standard oral hygiene products are loaded with fluoride. This exposure combined with drinking fluoridated tap water ends up creating a toxic level of fluoride in your body.

This toxic level leads to a condition known as dental fluorosis, which causes brown stains and damages your teeth.

What is Dental Fluorosis?

For decades dentists have informed us that our children need fluoride to shield their teeth from cavities. The fact is…

FLUORIDE IS COMPLETELY TOXIC.

And when consumed in high concentrations, fluoride causes dental fluorosis.

Fluorosis is a dental term that describes the developmental disturbance in regards to the enamel. It is not a disease, but rather a cosmetic condition. Overexposure to fluoride causes fluorosis, especially during the years when the teeth are developing, typically up to age 8.

The effects of fluoride on tooth enamel include lower mineral content and an increase in porosity. Typically, the dentist measures the damage by examining the surfaces of the teeth when clean, dry and under good lighting.

If the dentist suspects dental fluorosis, they can further examine your teeth and gums. X-rays are beneficial to make sure the teeth do not have any other defects, like cavities.

Dental fluorosis causes varying degrees of both aesthetic and physical damage to your teeth.

What causes brown stains on children’s teeth?

The visual effects of fluorosis dictates the severity and varying degrees of damage:

  • Healthy, Normal Teeth: appear to have a smooth, glossy surface, that’s typically a pale white color.
  • Moderate Fluorosis: Moderate cases will affect all enamel surfaces of the teeth. The surfaces will show wear as brown staining as the main feature. Teeth can also begin to erode and even crumble.
  • Severe Fluorosis: In severe cases of dental fluorosis, the enamel can become discolored. Stains will develop over time, which is due to diffusion of exogenous icons, such as iron and copper, into the abnormally porous enamel. These stains appear brown and are widespread, making the teeth look corroded. All enamel surfaces are now affected. The general form of the tooth may also be affected.

Dental fluorosis causes something that is called intrinsic discoloration.  What this means is that the inner structure  of your tooth, the dentin, darkens or gets a yellow tint. These intrinsic stains are much deeper in the tooth and are permanent. It is usually not possible to neutralize or lighten this type of discoloration.

Unfortunately, intrinsic discoloration caused by dental fluorosis can greatly affect one’s confidence… but fortunately there is a way to instantly transform your smile!

Next, let’s take a closer look at choosing the BEST option to get rid of those pesky stains.

How do you get brown stains off your teeth?

We have some good news and bad news.

The bad news is that brown stains caused by dental fluorosis are, like we previously mentioned, permanent. This means that no amount of teeth whitening will truly change the color of your teeth.

Can a dentist get rid of brown teeth stains?

Other methods of removing stains, such as contouring or traditional veneers, can potentially enhance the appearance of your teeth. However, these techniques pose several concerns that you must consider:

Contouring:

  • Puts you at risk for tooth breakage
  • Can cause teeth to become weak
  • Only slightly improves appearance
  • Causes sensitivity if too much enamel is removed
  • Permanently alters the tooth structure

Traditional Veneers:

  • Process is NOT reversible
  • Not repairable if they chip or crack
  • Teeth sensitivity to hot and cold
  • May not match exact color of other teeth
  • Upwards of $20,000 + for a complete smile makeover

As you can see… the risks and price of these procedures aren’t worth it!

But don’t fret just yet because there is a simple and affordable solution to instantly transform your teeth and your smile.

The Best Way to Replace Brown Stains with a Brighter & Whiter Smile

You can unlock your smile’s potential with Lab Direct custom removable veneers from Brighter Image Lab!

Check out these incredible reasons why removable veneers are a great choice to replace brown stains and make your smile sparkle:

Enhances estheticsWhitens & brightens teethLengthens small teeth
Reshapes smileHighlights your smileIncreases confidence
Fills unsightly gapsRemoves stainsAlters the look of teeth

Furthermore, you can easily take the first step in creating your custom veneers from the comfort of your couch because there is no need to visit a dentist. All of the materials you need to get started are delivered directly to your house.

No matter what type of result you are looking for, your dental dreams can come true with Brighter Image Lab.

You really can bring your smile to its ultimate level… without paying $20,000+ for a cosmetic smile makeover.

Let us introduce you to the life changing magic of removable dental veneers.

Join us as we welcome you to the future of smile design.

Come see how we can improve your smile in a way that you never thought imaginable. You truly owe it to yourself to look at BilVeneers from BrighterImageLab.com.

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Are you a victim of fluoride toxicity

Are You At Risk of The Dangers of Fluoride Toxicity?

Do you brush your teeth? Have you drank tap water throughout your life? If you answered “YES” to either or both of these, then you could be putting yourself at risk of the dangers of consuming too much fluoride. Why does this matter? Because when you ingest a lot of fluoride it causes a damaging health condition known as fluoride toxicity!

Let’s first take a look at what fluoride is and then the horrible dangers it poses to your health and wellness when over consumed.

What is Fluoride?

Fluoride is a mineral in your teeth and bones and is found naturally in water, soil, pants,  rocks, and air. It is also synthetically produced and added to drinking water, toothpaste, mouthwash, and other chemical products.

When it comes to your health, fluoride is primarily used to “improve” dental care because it is thought to strengthen the enamel of the teeth.

However, the scary truth is that because much of the water supply in the USA is still fluoridated. Plus you get additional exposure from dental products, which means you are most likely overloaded with FLUORIDE!

We’re not talking minor health issues… TOO much fluoride causes a condition known as fluoride toxicity.

What is Fluoride Toxicity?

You have most likely heard about fluoride at some point in your life.

But, how much do you really know about it?

Though there are some potential benefits of fluoride, however regulating the amount of fluoride you consume is crucial. Fluoride occurs both naturally and artificially in water. By the time we account for concentrated, fluoridated dental products and materials, it’s not hard for the average person to unintentionally (or intentionally!) consume too much fluoride:

Fluoride consumed at elevated levels is know to have seriously detrimental effects on the human body.

One of the most alarming conditions that is a result of fluoride toxicity is skeletal fluorosis.

Skeletal Fluorosis: Are You At Risk?

Uncontrolled fluoride consumption’s damaging powers are vast. Health problems associated with fluoride toxicity include bone cancer, brain cell damage, muscle disorders, arthritis, bone fractures, cell death, blood disorders, infertility, and a condition called skeletal fluorosis.

Skeletal fluorosis is a bone disease caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in your bones. The horrifying symptoms of this disease include:

  • Painful damage to your bones and joints
  • Hardened bone with increased frequency of fractures
  • Impaired joint mobility due to  thickening of the bone structure and accumulation of bone tissue.
  • Cartilage and ligaments  become ossified (turn into bone or bony tissue)

Skeletal fluorosis is a crippling, yet preventable, disease. Unfortunately, there are no effective therapeutic remedies available which have the power to cure fluorosis.

Therefore, you must take caution and be absolutely vigilant in monitoring you and your family’s fluoride intake.

The Dangers of Excessive Ingestion (Fluoride Toxicity)

It’s important to note that off-the-shelf oral hygiene products contribute heavily to excessive ingestion of fluoride:

  • In a large data collection effort regarding fluoride poisoning, the American Association of Poison Control (AAPC). determined that toothpaste ingestion was the main source of fluoride toxicity. Other likely culprits are mouthwashes and supplements.
  • Over 80% of the cases of fluoride toxicity reported, were in children under the age of 6. They found children of this age group ingest more toothpaste than pediatric dentists ‘recommend’ because they haven’t completely developed their swallowing reflex.

When consumed in large quantity, fluoride leads to dental fluorosis.

Fluorosis is a dental term that describes the developmental disturbance in regards to the enamel. It is not a disease, but rather a cosmetic condition. The effects of fluoride on tooth enamel include lower mineral content and an increase in porosity.

Fluoride In Water & Are You Drinking Too Much?

There is a plethora of information and research that shows the dangerous side effects of using fluoride. On the other hand, there are very few studies that show any significant benefits from drinking water containing fluoride.

When it comes to dental fluorosis, water fluoridation is an extremely controversial topic. Some view it as a public health measure, while others consider it an example of mass, systemic poisoning.

Fluoridated water accounts for 40% of all dental fluorosis cases, so there is a foundation for this extreme view. We consume these (sometimes) dangerous levels of fluoride via drinking water, children’s formula, or foods prepared with public drinking water.

This is a simple case of “You better be safe than sorry” and keep you and your family safe by avoiding excessive fluoride consumption. Follow these simple safety tips:

  • Drinking filtered and purified water
  • Using a homemade or all natural fluoride free toothpaste
  • Making a fluoride free mouthwash

What To Do About Fluoride Toxicity

Do you or someone you know have fluorosis? Are you concerned that Fluoride in water is staining your teeth? Would you like a solution that doesn’t require a dentist office visit and saves you 70%*?

Learn more about our amazing removable dental veneers: Press On Veneers, BILVeneers, and IncrediBIL Veneers.

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Fluoride in our tap water - is it safe?

Fluoride In Water Is Harming Your Health

You absolutely can’t miss out on what we are about to share about fluoride in water!

Do you have spots and stains on your teeth

Ever have trouble sleeping at night

Are there an extra few pounds around your middle

Your TAP water could be the culprit…

Read on to discover how fluoride harms your health and teeth and what you can do today to keep you safe.

What is Fluoride?

Fluoride is a mineral in your teeth and bones. It is found naturally in:

  • Water
  • Soil
  • Plants
  • Rocks
  • Air

It is also synthetically produced and added to drinking water, toothpaste, mouthwash, and other chemical products.

When it comes to your health, fluoride is primarily used to “improve” dental health because it is thought to strengthen the enamel of the teeth.

However, the scary truth is that because much of the water supply in the USA is still fluoridated. Plus you get additional exposure from toothpaste and other dental products, which means you are most likely being overloaded with FLUORIDE!

Why does this matter? Because it becomes HIGHLY toxic for your body!

Let’s take a closer look at what you need to know about fluoride in water and how it is potentially harming your health.

Fluoride in Water

Fluoride was added to water shortly after World War II in an attempt to improve dental care, however fluoridation continues to this day.

As with most new health ideas, there was a lot of excitement and focus on only the benefits of fluoride. The risks of regularly consuming it receives little consideration.

Nowadays, there is a plethora of information and research that shows the dangerous side effects of using fluoride – one of the side effects being its negative impact on your overall health and well-being.

One of the top harming effects of fluoride is that it prevents your pineal gland’s ability to function properly. It is located in the center of your brain and responsible for producing melatonin that regulates your sleep cycle.

When fluoride weakens your pineal gland, it can lead to a host of problems, such as:

  • Early aging
  • Sleeping trouble
  • Weight gain.

There are very few studies that show any significant benefits from drinking water containing fluoride. This is surprising considering the potential risks of consuming too much fluoride because of a fluoridated water supply.

Some studies even showed that cities which did not add fluoride to their drinking water had fewer cavities when compared to cities that did. The World Health Organization found that while only 3% of western European countries fluoridate their water, they have the same rate of dental cavities as areas that do not.

This study, and many other with similar results, should make you ponder….

Why are we drinking fluoride in the first place?

We must remind ourselves that fluoride itself is a toxic substance. So why, then, are we exposing ourselves to these toxins intentionally, through our water supply?

The Dangers of Fluoride in Water

Spots, specks, stains, dings, and damage.

All of these unsightly dental conditions are a result of exposure to TOO MUCH fluoride. Known as fluorosis, this cosmetic condition permanently changes the health of your teeth.

It should come as no surprise that dental fluorosis was rarely found in western countries prior to the widespread use of fluoride in the dental industry.

Dental fluorosis rates have been on the rise for years and have now reached groundbreaking levels. Information collected from a survey by the Centers for Disease Control revealed that:

  • 41% of American adolescents have some form of fluorosis.
  • That’s an increase of 400% from just 60 years ago.
  • Dentist offices continue to push fluoride treatments without properly informing parents of the potential risks
  • Dentists  fail to adequately educate on how to measure and manage the amount of fluoride their child is consuming.

Fluoride, fluoride E-V-E-R-Y-W-H-E-R-E!

So, what can you do to keep you and your family safe? Next, let’s take a closer look at the steps you can start taking TODAY to reduce your fluoride exposure.

Removing Fluoride From Water

If your efforts to petition you city to stop fluoridating your water are unsuccessful, there are steps you can take to remove it. Here are several options to choose from:

  1. Find Another Source: You can get your drinking water from an alternate source. Finding water processed by reverse osmosis or distilled is a good place to start. Your best bet is to choose alkaline or distilled water and AVOID tap water. A quick search of water delivery services in your area will provide options.
  2. Filter Your Own Water:  You can also filter your own water to remove added fluoride. From at-home filtration systems to water filtering pitchers, the market is full of products  that can help you get cleaner drinking water. Again, a quick search of water filtration devices will provide you solutions.

While it is extremely important to have filtered drinking water for yourself, there are even more special considerations to make when you have small children.

Keeping Children Safe

Using fluoride free water is particularly important for us in infant formula and baby food whenever possible.

When using tap water, formula-fed babies are at a higher risk. Even though the risk may be small, using filtered water in baby formula is an easy way to protect your child against dental fluorosis

One study found giving babies formula exposed them to 200X more fluoride than breastfed babies. Pediatrician, Dr. Yolanda White reported the following

“I diagnose dental fluorosis on average 5 times daily, but fluoride doesn’t only affect teeth. It can potentially affect the brain and nervous system, kidneys, bones and other tissues in young children during their critical stages of organ development.”

Now that you have cleaner and safer drinking water, the next step in protecting your health and teeth from overexposure to fluoride it to use healthier dental products.

Fluoride Facts: STOP Harming Your Health

If you are still a little skeptical about whether you need to avoid fluoride or not… here are 3 alarming fluoride facts:

  1. Many developed countries do NOT fluoridate their water: The consumption of water with fluoride is greater in the USA than in the WHOLE rest of the world combined!
  2. Fluoride is the only MEDICINE added to public water: Because it is added to water to prevent a tooth decay (a disease), it is considered a medicine by the Food and Drug Administration.
  3. Fluoride is NOT an essential nutrient: Need we say more?
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Severe Smile Makeover by Brighter Image Lab

Smile Makeover For Only $800 When a Dentist Wanted $18K

Watch Anna’s smile makeover. What is incredible about this story is that her dentist wanted $18,000! We were able to make her a new smile for under $1,000. We made a smile for her, and we can do it for you. See for yourself how we did it below.

Tooth Decay is a Major Issue

Tooth decay is a big deal in this country and it’s preventable. In fact if I’ve never said it before it’s the number one most preventable disease in this country and we’re not doing enough to cure it.

It gets bad and then within a few years of 18 people have decayed it so bad that people go WOW. They look at it like its social like it’s a social class like they just neglected it and people don’t understand the power of bacteria or how quick a smile can deteriorate.

Our story came from that she was 18 years old her teeth started going bad. At some point she went to dentist and was handed a bill for $18,000.

No Choice For Affordable Dental Care

$18,000 or nothing is not a choice. At Brighter Image Lab we try to do New Life Smile Makeovers because we think that anybody that’s sitting there with a smile is holding them back is not living their full life.

I think that we were able to show this young lady that you have a choice.

Leaving for South Dakota

Hey guys I’m at the airport today, and we’re flying to Rapid City, South Dakota.

This young lady is 28 years old with two kids. Since she was 18 years old she’s had a smile that she’s been embarrassed with. She gave me a story that said I went to the dentist and tried to get something done before it got worse.

Dental Costs Make New Smiles Unattainable

How do you tell a mom at 18 or 20 years old that it’s gonna cost $18,000 or we can’t do anything for you and then let them leave and continue to be embarrassed? We don’t do that anywhere else in society. We don’t do it anywhere.

…But she had gross embarrassment and nobody has helped her. There’s not anyone to turn to.

What we’re hoping is she’s gonna get a new smile, that it goes well, that she gets to see herself in a better light.

She’s young enough to where I don’t think her kids have seen her smile, I don’t think her husband sees her smile, hopefully it’ll all go well.

Follow me as we go along, and I’ll see at the end of this trip.

Arriving in South Dakota

We’re at the airport. We got it. We made it. Rapid City, South Dakota is a sunken, true treasure. If anybody’s not been here, they ought to look it up. But this smile makeover wouldn’t have been possible if it wasn’t for Lori.

She took it last minute. We called 40 different places and they kept saying no, we can’t do that much work…no, we don’t want the responsibility of it not working…no, it may be too hard, and Lori said come on in. If you have a need we’re gonna help you take care of it, and she did it. You want to talk about a first-class operation?

Ready For A New Smile

When I heard y’all were coming I was very ecstatic and excited and nervous, but I was ready for a new smile.

I’ve seen you change already, like, what I see is what I knew I would see, and when this magic’s done the whole village should have been here for you since you were 18. Can you tell me what happened? What caused it?

Um I said the dentist told me he that he believes its genetic. Yeah, cause my mother had very bad teeth too. After I had my first child, they just started getting really brittle.

But I’m telling, you just being happier and just seeing you here from when I saw you walking in it’s a difference of half-full or half-empty.

This Severe Makeover Was Harder Than We Thought

Everything was two or three times harder than we thought it was gonna be with more to do it wasn’t just let’s start and get finished.

Oh man, I think that having a new smile will bring me out of the house more and take me to do things with my children and actually be able to go out and have dinner or have a drink with my husband on a weekend.

Not being able to smile has brought on depression in my life and anxiety from it. I can’t enjoy plenty of things with my kids and my husband and you know, just as much as small as sitting around watching a comedy and they’re laughing and I’m not laughing because I don’t want to show my teeth.

You Can Always Improve Yourself

I would tell people at home that you’re never too old to have a great smile. You’re…You can always improve yourself.

I think if I could go back and tell myself something I would say to march straight to the dentist and get something done right now or it’s gonna, they’re gonna be ruined in no time…

…And when they tell me $18,000 I thought, um, I’ve got about three thousand dollars I can afford. It upset me, and I felt small. I felt like there was nothing else I could do.

The Dentist Didn’t Even Care

I felt like the dentist didn’t even care that I was…He could tell that I was self-conscious, right, and I felt like he didn’t even care.

Even when it’s time for us to go out and have dinner and things like that I want to dress up. I want to fix my hair and make-up, but I don’t. I feel like there’s no point whether I put it on or not my smile is still not gonna be there.

Oh, I wish every day I think about it every day that I wish I would have been able to do this sooner! I believe that with a new smile I will always be having my make-up on, my hair done, and I have a feeling that my wardrobe is about to get bigger!

The Smile Makeover Begins

I’m very nervous, but excited.

You’ve been going all day.

Uh huh.

And so, if you don’t mind…This one is our model version.

Okay.

See how polished that is?

Yes.

I want you to try that, let’s put it in, and you’ll have the biggest smile.

No, you’re gonna go right in.

We’re there. it’s gonna take a second, you just stay with it.

A Severe Makeover Feels Weird

How weird does it feel?

It feels weird.

Does it feel bulky?

Mmm hmm.

You gotta give it a few seconds.

Okay.

This Smile Makeover Looks Real

And we’re gonna try a different…You see that? No one can do that, and you haven’t seen enough of it. See they, I’m as close as you can be. Let’s look, here, you look amazing! Absolutely amazing!

I’m so close to you that I can’t tell and if I can’t tell nobody can tell.

You look amazing.

Thank you.

You look at the detail between the two teeth.

Mmm hmm.

It’s crazy.

No one’s ever going to be looking at your teeth like that. I wish you could see this.

Anna Sees Her Makeover For The First Time

Look in the mirror. Look who that is. For the first time that’s not anybody anyone is going to say no to. That’s a lady who came in and she’s amazing. You could be hired for real estate, you could be hired for sales. You could be hired for almost anything because they need you in the room. Because this girl’s so well put together, she’s amazing.

That’s my mom. This is my wife. There’s my daughter. You see what I’m saying? That’s my best friend. She had a long time with the sentencing that she didn’t deserve.

There Should Be Better Dental Options

$18,000 was not your only option. You should have had a better choice. Your little boy…I shouldn’t meet you before your little boy, or your daughter. She’s gonna can you imagine an example just how radiant a woman my mom, my mom decided to come back?

She’s four.

Please tell me you see what I see?

Oh yeah.

You don’t want to teach her not to smile. Don’t want to teach her all that. You should teach her to be excited!

I’m very excited! I can’t wait to my kids see it, or my husband.

Great First Impression

I have to tell you that I’m very impressed by the young lady we worked with. You know, all we ever see from the from the people who we pick for a New Life Smile is people that we think would actually have a lot of potential if they had a new smile.

I can tell you that hopefully you’ll see in the video that this young lady has a lot to say and a lot to do and she has a whole lot to offer.

At the end we get to meet a family and one of the most beautiful families you’ve ever met in your life.

The Severe Makeover Was A Challenge

I feel real good about what we did today. I have to say it was it was more of a challenge than I thought it was going to be. We had a situation where we came in and saw the town and Mount Rushmore was amazing.

I get the feeling that if you come in the summer you’ll never leave, but I also get the feeling that if you come in the winter you probably won’t ever come back.

You know there’s a lot of scenery here, a lot of things to do. It was a good, good, good trip. It was a quick in-and-out we had a great time, but the job that we did was tough.

Learning To Smile

To always train yourself to smile without showing your teeth it’s just not good. We’ve seen it in the past for people whose daughters aren’t used to seeing them smile, and we know as grown-ups, your babies learn how to how to interact based on how they see you interact.

I saw this young girl walk in an average mom that had been neglected with not a whole lot of extra.

You know people say that, you know cosmetic teeth are, just I mean the looks of your teeth are just cosmetic. That is so incredibly wrong, and I don’t know how else to say it.

Final Thoughts

This smile makeover did everything it could do. It’s amazing that the smile can do that little bitty of a thing imagine what it cost her not to have it for ten years and she is somebody that everybody should proud of and now you can tell her husband is already proud of her. You can tell her family thinks the world of her.

This is the kind of severe makeover that we want to do. We hope that you’re impressed by her before-and-afters. We hope you enjoy it and we’re gonna end it here.

This smile makeover happened in Rapid City, SD, but we hear stories from clients all over in areas like Sturgis, SD, Casper, WY, Grand Island, NE, Omaha, NE, Sioux Falls, SD, Sioux City, IA, Minneapolis, MN, St. Paul, MN, Bismarck, ND, Great Falls, MT, Cheyenne, WY, Fort Collins, CO, Denver, CO, Colorado Springs, CO, Manhattan, KS, Topeka, KS, Kansas City, MO, Overland Park, KS, Idaho Falls, ID, Boise, ID, Spokane, WA, Seattle, WA, Portland, OR, Salt Lake City, UT, Provo, UT, Grand Forks, MN, and Aberdeen, SD

Traditional Dental Veneers: A Perfect Problem - Remind yourself that it's okay to not be perfect

Traditional Dental Veneers and a Perfect Hollywood Smile

Traditional Dental Veneers: A Perfect Problem - Remind yourself that it's okay to not be perfect

The Real problem with traditional dental veneers has little to do with how they function or their performance. Who determines what a normal, aesthetically pleasing smile looks like is the real issue.

America struggled for decades with defining “image” as a marketplace bent on exploiting peoples’ flaws for economic gain. The danger of this national obsession has become systemic since the days of Twiggy. Fashion magazines offer Photoshopped perfection as the standard to which we should aspire.

Effects of Marketing Traditional Dental Veneers

The effects of this insidious marketing made their way into breast implants and the definition of a Hollywood smile. Carving their bodies and their teeth, people use their resources to chase a false picture of their “perfect” self. People make investments in the tens of thousands of dollars at their dentist office to get the “perfect” smile.

Jane’s Traditional Dental Veneers

This message has become so endemic that people with nice smiles are convinced only a “perfect” Hollywood smile is acceptable.

One particularly relevant example of this is highlighted in a June 2015 article entitled “Saving Jane’s Smile.” Gary Nankin, DDS discusses how he “saved” the smile of a patient who was not content with her first set of #porcelain veneers.

According to Dr. Nankin, Jane was unhappy with her traditional dental veneers:

About a year prior to her visit to my office, Jane got porcelain veneers. Her previous dentist placed them on her six top front teeth (numbers 6 to 11). From the very beginning, she was unhappy with them. She said that they just never felt like they belonged. The veneers felt bulky, flat, uneven. Most of the time they were so uncomfortable that she just wanted to “rip them out”. In addition, food frequently got stuck behind them. She thought it looked like the surface of the teeth had “divots” in them.Curated from Saving Jane’s Smile

The high bar of “perfection”

The woman deemed a less than perfect set of veneers for which she had certainly paid at least $10,000.00, Dr. Nankin outlined his approach to “saving” Jane’s smile:

The sequence outlined for Jane’s treatment was as follows:

1. Endodontic referral for treatment of tooth number 15, followed by a composite core build-up.

2. Periodontal therapy in both the anterior region and upper left to achieve optimal tissue health.

3. Wax up of maxillary and mandibular teeth with the plan to place all ceramic restorations on her teeth. (4 to 15, and 22 to 27) Including the construction of a Sil-Tech® PVS index of both the maxillary and mandibular wax ups. This aids in the construction of provisional restorations and utilizing the general shape of LVI Smile Catalog, “Natural.”

4. Preparation of maxillary teeth and placement of permanent restorations.

5. Placement of dental implant by the periodontist followed by preparation of mandibular teeth and placement of permanent restorations.6. Restore the now fully-healed and osseointegrated implant in the position of tooth number 30.

Curated from Saving Jane’s Smile

The link between self-esteem and self-worth

Regarding a person’s smile, the strong link to self-esteem and self-worth make an imperfect set of teeth a concern. However, the picture in the article clearly illustrates what appears to be a well-constructed and healthy-looking smile. The entire premise is puzzling. How does a dentist promote “saving” a smile that 97% of the people in America would love to show off?

One of the primary reasons cited by an article in The Journal of the American Dental Association makes it clear:

…with the decrease in caries [ tooth decay] prevalence, the focus shifted gradually from functional dentistry to esthetic dentistry. As a result, the perception of tooth appearance in modern society could influence the changes in patients’ needs.

Curated from Patients’ Satisfaction With Dental Esthetics

Functional Dentistry loses out to aesthetics

In other words, patients aren’t visiting the dentist primarily for tooth decay. Therefore, “needs” are more centered on aesthetics than functional dentistry. As a result, emphasis has shifted to creating a plan seeking to achieve the perfect smile at huge cost. The previous study details the effects:

Aesthetics has become an important aspect of dentistry. Until about the last two decades, clinicians considered aesthetics to be far less important than function, structure and biology. Today, however, if a treatment plan does not include a clear view of its aesthetic impact on the patient, the outcome could be disastrous.

Curated from Patient’s Satisfaction With Dental Esthetics

Capitalizing on the Commerce of Imperfection with Traditional Dental Veneers

How disastrous was not spending tens of thousands of dollars on a second set of veneers for Jane’s smile? Reclassifying “aesthetics” as a necessary component of dental care is particularly troubling as we cannot accurately measure or manage it. People trusting professional opinions of dentists are vulnerable to being convinced. Minor, aesthetic problems with their smile, they are told, require expensive measures to correct in order to be “normal”.

The Real Problem with Traditional Dental Veneers

Hence, the real problem with veneers lies in the ever more pervasive use of cosmetic dentistry. Covering up even the smallest flaw in order to capitalize on the dysfunctional body imagery of a vulnerable population. Requiring Jane’s “before” smile to be saved sets a high bar for a “normal” smile. So high, in fact, that natural, God-given teeth can never compete.

The High Cost of Traditional Dental Veneers

A cosmetic smile enhancement should not have to cost a fortune. You decide when and if you are ready for traditional veneers to achieve your perfect smile. Brighter Image Lab created removable dental veneers allowing people time to evaluate all options before committing to porcelain veneers. We understand that people want to be proud of their smile. As a result, we offer Press On Veneers as a choice for a non-dental, reversible, and removable cosmetic smile contrivance. Call and talk to Laurie Hall today to find out more about Press On Veneers.

Dentist Office

How dental marketing keeps me from visiting the dentist office

School was out! I think the only person more excited about the end of school, besides the school staff, was me. No more 6:30 wake up alarms for a solid month. Looking forward to a full seven hours of sleep, excitement filled my inner being. Then the reality of summer chores hit me. My list included athletic physicals, lawn mowing in the brutal Texas heat, and the dreaded trip to our local family dentist office.

Going to teeth cleaning was about as much fun for me as—nothing I can think of. As the Rolodex of chores whirred through my head, I paused at the dentist office to try for a second to wrap my mind around why I dreaded the task so much. Unlike so many people, I have insurance and access to dental health services.

Every dentist office was the same

The dental care associates that we had seen were all nice enough, but something about the process always put my teeth on edge, literally. It was never better in one dentist office than another. In a small town, my insurance company paid for X-rays I didn’t have time for. In a large town, I waited so far past my scheduled time that I felt like sending the dentist office a bill for my hourly rate.

Thinking it through, I realized that I feel constantly bombarded with dental marketing without any corresponding perceived value on my part. You see, if I felt “cared for” when I left, I might feel differently. However, I can barely tell one stagnant waiting room equipped with 24/7 Disney from another.

Dentist office or car dealership?

Between the Groupon offers, the Internet pop-ups, and the waving Zoom teeth whitening balloons, I feel stalked by dental professionals who see me as nothing more than a dollar sign and never as a person with financial difficulties. In fact, the only place that I have felt that hunted is the new car lot. Like so many people, I’ve sneaked in late at night to a closed chain car dealership just to avoid feeling like a bunny rabbit coated in Marinara sauce. All in the attempt to make an informed decision absent the sales pressure.

Dentist Office

Between the Groupon offers, the Internet pop-ups, and the waving Zoom teeth whitening balloons, I feel stalked by dental professionals who see me as a dollar sign and never as a person. In fact, the only place that I have felt that hunted is the new car lot. Like so many people, I’ve sneaked in at night to a closed dealership just to avoid feeling like a bunny rabbit coated in Marinara sauce. All in the attempt to make an informed decision absent the sales pressure.

The dentist office tacks cancer screenings and gum tissue measurements and a whole list of things they never did in the past onto my bill without question. Every time I pass a dentist office with the waving balloon I wonder why he’s so broke that he’s scrambling for my kid’s fluoride treatment like it’s the only thing that’s going to buy his lunch that day.

We need dental care, not dental retail

It wasn’t always that way. Dental care used to rank right next to medical care on the list of respectable professions. In the past, the only reason to dread going to the dentist office was the drill. Today, that’s the least of my worries. Oral hygiene shouldn’t be a fight. Anyone should be able to walk into a dentist office that is clean and calm, and feel like that professional has your best interest at heart. That’s what’s they used to call “a practice”. I would give my business to a place like that in a heartbeat. For life.That’s what people want when they need dental help. They’re fighting to protect themselves from professionals taking more and giving less. Less empathy, relationship, time, and education. Less dedication to the patient. The effect is endemic. The consequences for peoples’ oral health and the dentists who serve us is verging on catastrophic.

It’s not the dentists’ fault

Completing years of training, student loans, obtaining a license, and opening an office just to beg people to come in. Discounting procedures, installing iPads, and renting giant roadside balloons to bring patients in. Having to practice creative dentistry just to make it? Something is utterly broken.The dentists and we suffer this together, and yet we seem pitted against each other. Having gone through the issue, I came to the root of it: As a pacifist, I avoid conflict. I don’t want to fight my dentist (or anyone), and so I do the next best thing—Avoidance. Informing myself, I felt empowered with both my own interest and my dentist’s interest at heart.

The fight with the dentist office continues…

I felt the best approach was to get educated before going in. Knowing we’d engage in the same bi-yearly argument regarding fluoride treatments for kids, I prepared myself. I pulled up research and Youtube to see what was going on in the fluoride debate these days. Turns out, the tickle I felt about too much fluoride was real. But that’s an issue for another day.

Supreme Court rules limiting teeth whitening unconstitutional

U.S. Supreme Court rule – dentists cannot regulate teeth whitening

Supreme Court rules limiting teeth whitening unconstitutional

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the North Carolina dental board does not have the authority to regulate teeth whitening services. By a 6-to-3 vote, the court said that the state board, composed mainly of dentists, violated the nation’s antitrust laws by attempting to regulate teeth whitening competitors.

Teeth whitening at a dentist’s office can be expensive, so non-dentists started offering the service at a lower price at spas and shopping centers in North Carolina. The state board of dental examiners, which consists mainly of dentists, accused the non-dental teeth whitening businesses of practicing dentistry without a license. As a result, the board ordered them to stop regulate teeth whitening companies or face potential criminal charges.

Dentists regulate teeth whitening for personal gain

At that point, the Federal Trade Commission intervened to block the board’s actions. A lower court sided with the FTC. They agree state regulatory power ends when it gives private dentists the power to unlawfully knock out their teeth whitening competitors for personal gain.

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court also sided with the FTC. Writing for the six-justice majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy said that it is not even clear under North Carolina law that teeth whitening “constitutes the practice of dentistry.” He noted that states are normally immune from the federal antitrust laws. But in a case like this, where private dentists dominate a state dental board, he said, there is too great a risk of “self-dealing.”

The solution, he observed, is disinterested state authorities providing clear and active supervision to regulate teeth whitening. Unfortunately, the nation’s highest court found that did not exist in North Carolina.

What this means for other states

Almost all dental boards in the United States develop standards of professional conduct and dental care. These include continuing education requirements to maintain a high level of integrity and performance in the practice of dentistry. However, according to FTC records, a number of regulating dental boards have overstepped their authority. They make decisions not to “protect the public,” but to protect the special interest group they represent.

This decision not only affects the other states, but carries a mandate. States may only regulate teeth whitening through disinterested state authorities.

Is the Creative Diagnosis by a Texas Dentist really a ripoff?

My household’s level of confidence in dentistry is at an all-time low due to creative diagnosis. About six months ago, my Texas dentist informed me that my “bunny teeth” were likely getting in the way of my professional success, a problem he could correct with a (pricey) cosmetic procedure.

If I let him fix my teeth, he told me, he was sure I would start “dressing better.” A few months later, my husband scheduled a basic cleaning with a new Texas Dentist.

Once they had him in the chair and looked at his teeth, they informed him that the regular cleaning wouldn’t do at all: He would need to reschedule for an $800 deep cleaning. Creative diagnosis? No thanks. I’d rather go to Tijuana to get dental veneers.

We were convinced we must look like suckers—until I came across an op-ed in ADANews, the official publication of the American Dental Association. The article, by longtime pediatric dentist Jeffrey Camm, described a disturbing trend he called creative diagnosis — the peddling of unnecessary treatments.

The Mystery of Creative Diagnostics by Dentists

William van Dyk, a Northern California dentist of 41 years, saw Camm’s op-ed and wrote in: “I especially love the patients that come in for second opinions after the previous dentist found multiple thousands of dollars in necessary treatment where nothing had been found six months earlier. And, when we look, there is nothing to diagnose.”

“In recent years, I have been seeing more and more creative diagnosis,” Camm told me when I called him at his practice in Washington state. A Texas dentist, he said, might think, “‘Well, the dental insurance covers this crown, so I’m not hurting this patient, so why don’t I just do it?’ That’s the absolutely wrong approach.”

Poking around, I found plenty of services catering to Texas dentists hoping to increase their incomes. One lecturer at a privately operated seminar called The Profitable Dentist ($389) aimed to help “dentists to reignite their passion for dentistry while increasing their profit and time away from the office.”

Is the ADA Perpetuating Creative Diagnosing?

Even the ADA’s 2014 annual conference offered tips for maximizing revenue: “Taking time to help our patients want what we know they need,” notes one session description, “can drive the economic and reward engine of our practice.” Could this be the source of creative diagnosis?

Do you think you’ve been the victim of “creative diagnosis” from any of these dentists?

Name

Website

Phone

Address

Rodolfo “Rudy” G. Ramos Jr., D.D.S., P.C.http://www.rudyramosdds.com/

(713) 973-9591

9545 Katy Freeway, Ste. 125, Houston, Texas, 77024
Steven Austin, D.D.S.http://drsteveaustin.com

(806) 358-7646

2815 South Georgia, Amarillo, Texas, 79109
Tamela L. Gough, D.D.S., M.S.http://www.allenkidsdentist.com/

(972) 727-0737

201 N Alma Dr Ste 100, Allen, Texas, 75013
James W. Chancellor, D.D.S.

(210) 653-4410

4952 Windsor Hill, Suite 201, San Antonio, Texas, 78239
D. Bradley Dean, D.D.S.http://www.ntxpa.com/

(972) 964-2900

3900 American Drive, Suite 101, Plano , Texas, 75075
Christie Leedy, D.D.Shttp://www.abilenedental.com/

(325) 692-3344

5309 Buffalo Gap Rd, Abilene, Texas, 79606
Kirby Bunel Jr., D.D.S.http://www.texarkanacosmeticdentistry.com/

(903) 794-3331

1701 Moores Lane, Texarkana, Texas, 75503
Dr. Mark Peppard, DDShttp://www.pepdds.com/

(512) 835-9557

4005 Spicewood Springs Road, Building C, Ste 500, Austin, Texas, 78759
Dr. Jennifer Bonehttp://hillcountrydentalassociates.com/

(830) 257-3000

710 Hill Country Dr #1, Kerrville, Texas, 78028
Dr. Donna Miller, DDShttp://creekwooddentalarts.com/

(254) 772-3632

7911 Woodway Drive, Waco, Texas, 76712
Dr. Ronald Rheahttp://www.dentistsattcv.com/rhea.html

(713) 467-3458

791 Town & Country Blvd Suite 222, Houston, Texas, 77024
Dr. Craig Armstrong, DDShttp://www.craigarmstrongdds.com/

(832) 251-1234

10370 Richmond Avenue, Suite 780, Houston, Texas, 77042

Upselling in dentistry isn’t a new phenomenon, but it’s having a moment. One reason: Texas Dental school tuition—and debt—has doubled since the ’90s.

Is High Debt Causing Creative Diagnosis by a Texas Dentist?

According to the American Dental Education Association, students who graduated in 1996 were in the hole $112,000 (in 2013 dollars), on average, while 2013 grads were a whopping $215,000 in debt—28 percent were on the hook for $300,000 or more.

By contrast, the average med school grad owed $170,000. ADEA executive director Richard Valachovic explained that one reason dental schools have jacked up tuitions is the rising costs of technology for student labs.

In any case, a generation ago, newly hatched Texas dentists would join established practices as modestly paid associates, with the promise of eventually becoming partners. But these days, with dentists retiring later, there’s less turnover in private practice tempting new dentists to forgo dental care and engage in creative diagnosis.

Are Dental Chains Asking Dentists to Diagnose Creatively?

Instead, more and more young dentists are taking jobs with chains, many of which set revenue quotas for practitioners. This has created some legal backlash: In 2012, for example, 11 patients sued (PDF) a 450-office chain called Aspen Dental, claiming that its model turns dentists into salespeople.

Some corporate dentists appear to have crossed the line into fraud. In 2010, Small Smiles, a venture-capital-owned chain with offices in 20 states, was ordered to refund $24 million to the government after an investigation found that its dentists had been performing unnecessary extractions, fillings, and root canals on children covered by Medicaid. Could these corporations be the reason behind creative diagnosis?

A new lawsuit alleges that some toddlers it treated underwent as many as 14 procedures—often under restraint and without anesthesia. (The group was banned from Medicaid this year.) Several other pediatric dentistry chains have been sued as a result of similar allegations.

Advice for Creative Diagnostic Attempts by Your Dentist

So how can you spot creative diagnosis when you go for your next cleaning? First, beware of specials: That laser dentistry and whitening package may be a ploy to get you in the door so the practice can upsell you on more-profitable procedures.

Van Dyk also advises caution if your Texas dentist insists on replacing old fillings or recommends crowns instead of fillings. And look out for excessive X-rays: The ADA says healthy patients need a full set (14 to 22) every two years at the most.

If your Texas dentist recommends a special “cone-beam” X-ray, get a second opinion. Along with a 3-D picture of your mouth, it delivers radiation up to 18X that of a traditional dental X-ray.

Radiation experts worry that some Texas dentists are substituting FDA approved cone-beam scanners for a standard X-ray.

Dealing with Creative Diagnosis in Pediatrics by a Texas Dentist

Finally, when it comes to children’s dentists, make sure to find a board-certified pediatric specialist. Not all dentists that cater to children have special training.

The practitioners I spoke to were quick to add that even dubious-sounding treatments are in some cases medically necessary, and not necessarily creative diagnosis.

In conclusion, if your gut says your dentist is going overboard on treatment, get a second opinion. “Will you have to pay a little more for another consult?” Camm asks. “Sure. But it could end up saving you a whole lot more in the long run.”

Curated from Is Your Dentist Ripping You Off? | Mother Jones

Bad teeth in a rich dentist world is shameful

Have a mouthful of poor teeth shaped by a childhood in poverty? Don’t go knocking on the door of a Rich Dentist.

I am bone of the bone of them that live in trailer homes. We grew up next to Tiffany ‘Pennsatucky’ Doggett, the hostile former drug addict from the prison TV drama Orange Is the New Black. You know her by her poor teeth.

Pennsatucky – a scrappy slip of a woman menacing, beating and proselytising to fellow inmates – stole the show during the first season of the Netflix prison series. But amid an ensemble cast of similarly riveting, dangerous characters, it was her grey, jagged poor teeth that shocked viewers into repulsed fixation. She was the villain among villains, a monster that fans loved to hate; ‘Pennsatucky teeth’ became a pejorative in social media.

Bad teeth in a rich dentist world is shameful

America’s first glimpse of poor teeth

Actress Taryn Manning’s gnarly, prosthetic teeth startled viewers because, by and large, poor characters in TV and film are played by actors whose whitened, straightened, veneered smiles aren’t covered up. It’s hard to think of characters besides Pennsatucky through whom heinous teeth convey rather than lampoon the physicality of the poor. The first that comes to mind is the derelict serial killer in a movie actually called Monster (2003); as with Manning, Charlize Theron’s Oscar-winning transformation generated astonishment with fake teeth.

In my life, Pennsatucky and her poor teeth are entirely familiar. She’s the slurring aunt who passed out in our farm’s swimming pool while babysitting me, and later stole my mom’s wedding band to buy the drugs that dug grooves in her cheeks. She’s the step-parent whose brain, organs and teeth corroded over the years and now lives in a mobile-home park with my construction-worker dad.

But Pennsatucky’s teeth aren’t just ‘meth teeth.’ They are the teeth of poor folk, of the young grandma who helped to raise me and for decades worked from diner to factory line to a desk job as a probation officer for the county court system in Wichita, Kansas. She was just 35 when I was born, so I knew her as a radiant thing; at the downtown courthouse, where I tagged along – babysitters are expensive – attorneys turned flirtatious near her green eyes, long limbs and shiny, natural-blonde bob. Then at night, in her farmhouse or the tiny brick house we fixed up in a rough Wichita neighborhood, I watched her take out her teeth, scrub them with a rough brush, and drop them into a cup of water with a fizzy tablet.

Prevention isn’t enough to save teeth

‘Brush your teeth and don’t eat too much candy,’ she’d tell me. ‘You don’t want to end up like Grandma.’ She’d widen her eyes and pop her dentures forward so that they bulged from her lips, sending me giggling. In the early 1970s, a rich dentist had pried every one of her teeth, too far gone or too expensive to save, from her 20-something skull. She’s 69 now and has worn false teeth for more than 40 years.

‘I had poor teeth all my life. They were straight and looked OK, but I always had toothaches,’ she tells me when I ask how she ended up with dentures. As I was growing up, the story fluctuated – she was in a car accident, her natural teeth just fell out, and so on. ‘I was excited to have them, knowing I would never have another toothache. Now I think it was pretty stupid, but at the time it was really painful, and I thought I was doing the right thing.’

Poor Teeth is Social Warfare

More than 126 million people in the US – nearly half the population – had no dental coverage in 2012, according to the US National Association of Dental Plans. In 2007, the New York State Dental Journal reported that while only one-tenth of general physician costs were paid out of pocket, nearly half of all dental costs were settled directly by patients. This reflects spending by the uninsured but also those sharing costs with coverage providers; most plans cover routine cleanings but leave patients to pay for 20 to 50 per cent of fillings, crowns and other big-ticket visits. For those who can’t afford to pay that difference, treatment is delayed and poor teeth continue to degrade.

But expense isn’t the only barrier to dental care. Those on Medicaid find that few rich dentists participate in the program due to its low payout. And more than 45 million people in the US live in areas, often rural or impoverished, with rich dentist shortages, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services. Medicare, as a general rule, doesn’t include dental.

In the past year, the Affordable Care Act, or ‘ObamaCare’, has changed many lives for the better – mine included. But its omission of dental coverage, a result of political compromise, is a dangerous, absurd compartmentalization of health care, as though teeth are apart from and less important than the rest of the body.

It wasn’t sugar that guided our dental fates. And it wasn’t meth. It was lack of insurance, lack of knowledge, lack of good nutrition.

Dental care isn’t available to many

About a decade ago, at the age of 50, my dad almost died when infection from an abscessed tooth poisoned his blood and nearly stopped his heart. He has never had dental insurance and has seen a rich dentist only a handful of times when some malady became unbearable. In 2009, according to the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, dental issues caused about 936,000 emergency-room visits and almost 13,000 inpatient hospital stays. Many of these patients had low incomes and dental coverage that restricted care to emergencies or wasn’t accepted by accessible dentists.

‘I notice people’s teeth because mine are so bad,’ Dad tells me during a break from a side job renovating a fraternity house. He has long been the handsome object of crushes, but his teeth have become increasingly askew with time, one of his eye teeth now ragged and long like a rabbit’s for lack of a carrot to file it down. ‘Nutrition affects teeth, right?’

I point out that Gatorade, which he favors when he splurges on a bottled beverage, is full of sugar. But it wasn’t sugar, heaps of which are sucked down daily by the middle and upper classes, that guided his and my grandma’s dental fates. And it wasn’t meth. It was lack of insurance, lack of knowledge, lack of good nutrition – poverties into which much of the country was born.

The poor endure undue criticism

My family’s distress over our teeth – what food might hurt or save them, whether having them pulled was a mistake – reveals the psychological hell of having poor teeth in a rich, capitalist country: the underprivileged are priced out of the dental-treatment system yet perversely held responsible for their dental condition. It’s a familiar trick in the privatization-happy US – like, say, underfunding public education and then criticizing the institution for struggling. Often, the conditions of teeth are blamed solely on the habits and choices of their owners, and for the poor therein lies an undue shaming.

‘Don’t get fooled by those mangled teeth she sports on camera!’ says the ABC News host introducing the woman who plays Pennsatucky. ‘Taryn Manning is one beautiful and talented actress.’ This suggestion that poor teeth and talent, in particular, are mutually exclusive betrays our broad, unexamined bigotry toward those long known, tellingly, as ‘white trash.’ It’s become less acceptable in recent decades to make racist or sexist statements, but blatant classism generally goes unchecked. See the hugely successful blog People of Walmart that, through submitted photographs, viciously ridicules people who look like contemporary US poverty: the elastic waistbands and jutting stomachs of diabetic obesity, the wheelchairs and oxygen tanks of gout and emphysema.

Class warfare knows no boundaries

Upper-class supremacy is nothing new. A hundred years ago, the US Eugenics Records Office not only targeted racial minorities but ‘sought to demonstrate scientifically that large numbers of rural poor whites were genetic defectives,’ as the sociologist Matt Wray explains in his book Not Quite White: White Trash and the Boundaries of Whiteness (2006). The historian and civil rights activist W E B du Bois, an African American, wrote in his autobiography Dusk of Dawn (1940) that, growing up in Massachusetts in the 1870s, ‘the racial angle was more clearly defined against the Irish than against me. It was a matter of income and ancestry more than color.’ Martin Luther King, Jr made similar observations and was organizing a poor-people’s march on Washington at the time of his murder in 1968.

Such marginalization can make you either demonize the system that shuns you or spurn it as something you never needed anyway. When I was a kid and no one in the family had medical or dental insurance, Dad pointed out that those industries were criminal – a sweeping analysis that, whether accurate or not, suggested we were too principled to support the racket rather than too poor to afford it.

A bad smile leads to bullying

My baby teeth were straight and white, and I wasn’t obese – an epidemic among poor kids that hadn’t yet taken hold in the 1980s – but I had plenty of ‘tells’: crooked bangs, trimmed at home with sewing shears; a paper grocery sack carrying my supplies on the first day of school while other kids wore unicorn backpacks. A near-constant case of ringworm infection (I kept a jar of ointment on my nightstand year-round).

The smell of cigarette smoke on my clothes, just as cigarettes were falling out of favor with the middle and upper classes. Sometimes, ill-fitting clothes, as when the second-grade teacher I revered looked at my older cousin’s shirt sagging off my shoulder and said: ‘Tell your mother to send you to school in clothes that fit you.’

In fifth grade, a girl noticed my generic, plastic-smelling, too-pointy boots – a Kmart version of the black leather lace-ups that were in fashion – and for weeks hounded me before and after school, kicking dirt on my shins and calling me Pippi Longstocking.

I had moments of cool clothes and good haircuts, too, and I was a confident child who earned friends and accolades. But I still think of the boy who handed me a dessert cup from his lunch box every day when a mix-up in the free-lunch program left me without a meal card for months.

He pulled from my skull the greyed tooth, cracked perfectly down the middle.

Common throughout those years was a pulsing throb in my gums, a shock wave up a root when biting down, a headache that agitated me in classrooms. While they looked OK, my baby teeth were cavity-ridden. Maybe it was the soy formula in my bottle when they were growing in, or the sugary cereals to which my brain later turned for dopamine production in a difficult home. Maybe it was because our water supply, whether from a rural well or the Wichita municipal system, wasn’t fluoridated. But richer teeth faced the same challenges. The primary reason my mouth hurt was lack of money.

Tooth loss takes am emotional toll

Once, around third grade, an upper molar that had menaced beyond all – the worst toothache I ever had – finally rotted so thoroughly that it cracked in half while still in my jaw. Mom took me to the rich dentist, somehow. The pain was tremendous, he explained, because the pulpy nerve at the tooth’s center was exposed. He pulled from my skull the greyed tooth, cracked perfectly down the middle, and let me take it home. For years, I kept the two pieces in a tiny jewellery box, sometimes taking them out and joining them like interlocking sides of the heart-shaped friendship necklaces I coveted.

Around that time, I had my jaw X-rayed for the first time. The results were grim.

‘You might as well start saving for braces right now,’ my mom recalls the rich dentist saying. We were at the outset of a post-divorce period that would include much moving and a slew of partial-coverage dental insurance plans: employer-based, which would be cancelled with Mom’s regular job switches, and variations on state-funded, poor-kid programs in between. Each time the policy changed, Mom had to find a new rich dentist who would accept our coverage. Then we’d ride out a waiting period before scheduling a cleaning or filling. My dental records were often lost in this shuffle, as was the case with my general health files in doctors’ offices and school districts – I got a new round of shots just about every year for lack of immunization records on file.

There would, of course, be no saving for braces.

It took years to find out whether the X-raying dentist’s pessimistic prediction would come true. My baby teeth were slow to fall out, their replacements slow to grow in. But at some point came the unequivocal, surprising verdict: my teeth grew in straight.

I don’t just mean straight enough, I mean 99th-percentile straight, I mean dentists call hygienists over to take a look.

‘Doesn’t she have pretty teeth?’ they say, my mouth under hot lamps. ‘Are you sure you didn’t have braces? But you whiten them, right?’

I shake my head no and in the dentist’s chair tingle with the bliss of gratitude. That my environment and genes somehow conspired to shake out a bright, orderly smile is a blessing I can’t explain. But I can tell you what preserved the blessing: me.

Following all of the rules

When a health teacher said brush your teeth twice a day, I brushed my teeth twice a day. When a TV commercial imparted that rich dentists recommend flossing daily, I flossed daily. A college room-mate once remarked on the fervor of my dental regimen. After boozy nights, when other kids were passing out, I held on, stumbled to the bathroom and squeezed paste onto a brush. However tired, however drunk, I scrubbed every side of every tooth, uncoiled a waxed string and threaded it into sacred spaces.

Privileged America judges harshly the mouths that chew orange Doritos, drink yellow Mountain Dew, breathe with a sawdust rattle.

The cycle of poor teeth continues

A bad smile, I knew, beget not just shame but more poorness: people with a bad smile have a harder time getting jobs and other opportunities. People without jobs are poor. Poor people can’t access dentistry – and so goes the cycle.

If Pennsatucky ever gets out of poverty, it will be thanks in part to a prison-yard fight in the season-one finale, when the upper-class protagonist knocks out her nasty grill; early in the second season, her rotten gums nearly toothless, she blackmails the warden into a new set of teeth. Upon incarceration, Pennsatucky traded meth for ‘born-again’ religious fanaticism, but her new teeth are a harbinger of a more substantive rebirth. If the eyes are the soul’s windows, its door is the mouth – the fence across which pass food, drink, words, our very breath.

Privileged America, ever striving for organic purity, judges harshly the mouths that chew orange Doritos, drink yellow Mountain Dew, breathe with a sawdust rattle, carry a lower lip’s worth of brown chaw, use dirty words and bad grammar. When Pennsatucky gets out of prison, she’ll need respect, rehabilitation, employment. To that end, for all her praying and testifying, Pennsatucky’s pearly gates might be her pearly, albeit prosthetic, whites. She cries with joy in a prison van on the way to get them, and later shows off with an over-the-top smile during laundry duty.

‘You’re acting a little, like, retarded,’ an envious inmate tells her.

‘I’m not retarded,’ she says. ‘I got new teeth!’

The emotional effects of poor teeth

When I was a young adult, I learnt I’d been born without wisdom teeth. The dentist told me I was ‘evolutionarily advanced’ since human beings, no longer in the business of tearing raw flesh from mastodon bones, don’t need so many teeth now. So many TV shows, bad jokes and bucktoothed hillbilly costumes in Halloween aisles had suggested that my place of origin made me ‘backwards’, primitive and uncivilised, that the dentist’s comment struck me deeply, just as in fourth grade when I read the word ‘genius’ in a school psychologist’s evaluation notes to my mother and wept on the sidewalk.

Having straddled a class divide and been wrongly stereotyped on both sides of it, throughout my life I’ve found peace in the places and things that don’t evaluate my status: nature, animals, art, books. ‘I sit with Shakespeare,’ wrote du Bois in The Souls of Black Folk (1903), ‘and he winces not.’ Social disadvantage and hazard engender what he called ‘double consciousness’, the ever-present awareness of more than one self. For du Bois, his most challenging two-ness in the wake of slavery was to be educated and black – a tension of socialisation still at work, to be sure, as President Barack Obama’s raw first memoir attests. Today, for me and millions of people in the US living on one side of a historic income gap, the defining double consciousness is to be educated and poor.

You can’t escape your class

The latter, for many of those who suffered losses after the economic collapse of 2008, is a terrifying new identity, its horror projected on to Pennsatucky’s serrated mouth and hard to reconcile with the Americans they thought they were. But in my academic and professional ‘climbing’, I learnt early and often that one doesn’t leave a place, class or culture and enter another, but rather holds the privilege and burden of many narratives simultaneously.

Friends who know my background sometimes kid me when I’m drunk and misconjugate a verb or slip into a drawl, or when, thoroughly sober, I reveal a gross blind spot in the realm of book-learning (if, say, the question involves whatever one learns in sixth grade, most of which I spent playing in red dirt outside a two-room schoolhouse near the Oklahoma state line). They smile at the pleasure I take in scoring solid furniture from yard sales or, once, for expressing delight over a tiny cast-iron skillet, a miniature version of the pan my grandma once used to fight a drunken stepfather off her mother. I enjoy the kidding and feel appreciated when they recognize the true clichés that weave my story.

Mis-education knows no class

But here’s the thing: wealthy people use cast-iron skillets and bad grammar, too. It’s just not their narrative and thus passes without remark. I’ve observed fellow journalists, the same ones who made trailer-park tornado survivors famous for a loose grip on the past participle, edit dumb-sounding quotes by city commissioners to suit the speaker’s stature.

And while I took the education I wasn’t given through libraries, encyclopedias and my former stepfather’s New Yorker subscription, plenty of members of the middle and upper classes refuse or lack the ability to seize the opportunities handed them.

It can be useful to acknowledge the cultural forces that carve us, or edifying to indulge in the tropes of our assigned narratives, but true distinctions of character, intelligence, talent and skill exist at the level of the individual, not of the class – or the ethnicity, the gender, the sexual orientation, the religion and so on. To claim otherwise, as we’ve discovered across time and countless persecutions of our own doing, is at best an insult and at worst an excuse for enslavement and genocide.

The liberal proponents of Occupy Wall Street are often the same people who think Southerners are inbred and Walmart shoppers slovenly miscreants.

Your social position follows you

In Thomas Harris’s best-selling crime-novel series, the FBI consults the imprisoned serial killer and mastermind psychiatrist Hannibal Lecter in its search for ‘the Tooth Fairy’, a family-slayer who bites his victims with dentures made from a mould of his grandmother’s distorted, razor-sharp teeth. Years after that manhunt, the FBI again turns to Lecter for help; this time, the refined sociopath – a former philharmonic orchestra board member and mannerly purveyor of his victims’ flesh – finds it more interesting to analyze the agent than the latest case.

‘You know what you look like to me, with your good bag and your cheap shoes?’ he asks the young agent Clarice Starling – who comes from the same place as Pennsatucky but whose intellect, health, grit and ambition, presumably, landed her on the right side of the prison bars. ‘You look like a rube. A well-scrubbed, hustling rube with a little taste. Good nutrition’s given you some length of bone, but you’re not more than one generation from poor white trash, are you, Agent Starling? And that accent you’ve tried so desperately to shed: pure West Virginia. What is your father, dear? Is he a coal miner?’

Take a good look at yourself

Lecter’s condescending soliloquy from a cell decorated with sketches of the Duomo cathedral in Florence – a place Starling surely hadn’t heard of when she left her family sheep farm for the FBI Academy at Quantico – hits home but doesn’t derail her. His most famous line – the aggressive posturing about fava beans and good Italian wine – happens when Starling sends a psychological evaluation through the glass and tells him to look at his damn self. We should do the same in the US, where the liberal proponents of Occupy Wall Street are often the same people who think Southerners are inbred and Walmart shoppers slovenly miscreants with no social awareness.

A century ago, du Bois wrote: ‘The problem of the 20th century is the problem of the colour line.’ The problem of the 21st century is that of the class line. For the American Dream to put its money where its mouth is, we need not just laws ensuring, say, universal dental care, but individual awareness of the judgments we pass on people whose bad smile – or clothes, waist lines, grocery carts, or limps – represent our worst nightmares.

The Decline of Dental Care in America

Picture the ideal “American dream” family. A father with a job that pays well, a nurturing mother, and their 2.5 children. This family has the time and money to schedule all of their necessary dental care.

In this reality, the father’s job probably has excellent benefits that include dental insurance. The mother will take the children to their dentist appointments. The children grow up with the assurance of regular dental care. The kind of care that provides braces to fix any issues with their smile.

This upper middle-class family with already perfect teeth easily makes the recommended bi-annual trips to the dentist for upkeep. Unfortunately, this is not an actuality for the majority of families. Many poor and lower-middle-class families do not receive adequate dental care, in part because most dentists want customers who can pay cash or have private insurance.

This prevalent problem raises the following question. Is the dentist in the habit of helping people, or in the business of making money? Look at the following statistics and decide for yourself.

The Cost of Dental Care in America

Rising dentist incomes reflect the lack of dental care for those who can't afford it

Dentist fees have risen much faster than inflation. In real dollars, the cost of the average dentist procedure rose 25% from 1996 to 2004.

In addition, dentists’ incomes have grown much faster than that of the typical worker. American dentists in general practice made an average salary of $164,570 in 2012. In contrast, the average salary among the general public was $51,017 that same year.

Average household income can't afford dental care

The American Dental Association believes this imbalance comes from a shortage of dentists. However, we believe the true problem stems from dentists unwillingness to practice in areas where they are needed.

Dentists have a disproportionate presence in affluent suburbs. However, those who are most in need of care are concentrated in inner cities and rural communities. As many as 130 million Americans do not have dental insurance coverage. Some of those have to use Medicaid to even gain access to dental care.

The State of Dental Care in America

Unfortunately, only about 20% of the nation’s practicing dentists provide care to people with Medicaid. Of those who do, only a small percentage primarily serve the poor, chronically ill, or rural communities.

The “typical” family referenced earlier is merely a fantasy for the majority of hard-working people. Taking care of a family doesn’t afford regular dental visits, much less any sort of cosmetic dentistry.

Those who can afford dental care don’t need it. Those who need dental care can’t afford it, and as a result, may be in desperate need of a dentist.

Affordable Dental Choices are Available

Brighter Image Lab is providing an affordable dental choice with their Press On Veneers since 2010, and BILVeneers just introduced in 2017.

Press On Veneers by Brighter Image Lab

Nearly 10 years ago, we began creating new Press On Veneers ™ for our clients. Since then we helped thousands of smiles transition from bad to beautiful. Keep reading to learn how!

What are Press On Veneers?

At Brighter Image Lab, we believe that everyone has the right to a bright, beautiful smile. We took our lab-direct business model and developed a unique process to give our clients the smile they deserve at a greatly reduced price.

Using advanced technology, our design team and lab technicians work to create custom-veneers for each individual client. New Press On Veneers ™ are a single piece made from a unique composite resin that fit over the front 10 – 12 teeth on the top and 6 – 8 teeth on the bottom. They ensure that teeth are covered when talking or smiling.

Why is our business necessary?

Press On Veneers by Brighter Image Lab

Unfortunately, not everyone has access to regular dental care. More than 47 million people in the United States live in “dental health shortage areas”. As many as 130 million Americans don’t have dental insurance.

Frankly, dentists are not doing their part to help those in need, and someone needs to step up to help. While the number of businesses offering dental insurance has continued to fall, the cost of a visit to the dentist has risen rapidly.

People with chipped, cracked, missing, or misaligned teeth need a solution that won’t cost them several thousand dollars, and we are happy to be able to offer that to them.

Brighter Image Lab is a dental laboratory that deals directly with the public. We bypass a dentist visit in order to craft custom-made veneers for a fraction of what they would spend otherwise.

Are New Press On Veneers ™ right for everyone?

Many people are good candidates for New Press On Veneers ™. In order to qualify, a client must have four natural teeth on the target arch (top or bottom).

The veneers grip onto the back of existing teeth. They hold to the teeth by the mouth’s natural suction. Once in place, the tongue cannot move the veneers, and there is no need for any glue or dental adhesive.

Can I get Press On Veneers at home?

Yes! In fact, we only sell Press On Veneers online, lab direct. This means you never have to see a “Press On Veneers dentist” because they don’t exist. You can’t find the best Press On Veneers on Amazon or eBay, but right here on our website.

We design Press On Veneers top and bottom at our lab, but we ship them all over the world. You never have to worry whether you can find Press On Veneers near me because we are near everyone. We deliver the same Press On Veneers in the UK that we deliver to the Tampa, Florida.

Are there any reviews?

Clients ask us all the time where they can read a Press On Veneers review. There are a select few under the order area of our website, but the vast majority of reviews Press On Veneers have garnered can be found on Google Reviews.

Brighter Image Lab’s reviews have greatly improved since we first started making them. In fact, there were many complaints which clients still find and read today. Like most product launches, we did experience a rough start. We are continually looking to improve our products and services though, and we now have between and 4-5 star rating on Google Reviews, and new reviews are rolling in all the time!

How do I get Press On Veneers?

When you’re ready to place your order you can visit our website by clicking the Dental Veneers link in the header. Our website has a slider of hundreds of Press On Veneers before and after photos, a full list of pricing for New Press On Veneers ™, all of our information, how-to videos, and more.

We know clients are always looking for a Press On Veneers coupon code or asking when the next Press On Veneer sale is. We never want to sell them cheap because we feel like we would begin to sacrifice quality for price. The amount Press On veneers costs covers our expenses for making this custom fit veneer and allows us to continue to innovate these veneers. This ensures when you order, you always get the very best product available.

#BrighterImageLab was founded in 1997 by Director Bil Watson. The company began as teeth whitening business, but eventually realized there were needs that weren’t being addressed. People were unhappy with their smile because of more than just slight discoloration. Their Bilistic Tooth Polisher is the newest teeth cleaning product and has been a hot seller on Amazon and other online retail outlets.

Because of our lab-direct system we are able to serve clients all over the world. Contact us with questions or give us a call at 1-888-257-2455.