Tag Archives: dentistry

State Boards killing good ideas like Non-Dental Teeth Whitening

What do Non-Dental Teeth Whitening, Legalzoom, and Uber have in common?

The last decade has ushered in exponential growth in many businesses like non-dental teeth whitening. They have introduced the public to new approaches and opportunities that technology has made available.

LegalZoom, for example, is a business that resonated profoundly with a public that was tired of being separated from opportunity simply because there were no affordable options. Today, it has found its way into the home of every businessperson wanting to branch out with a new idea. So also was the case with Tesla, Uber, and non-dental teeth whitening.

The phenomenon of creating new paths to opportunity is the anchoring standard of technology. However, in areas that are controlled by state licensing agencies, business evolution that benefits the consumer—rather than the participants—are never welcome.

The pioneers who harness technology, operate on the fine line of technology and the state licensing in their area. They drive forward with new innovative designs that create low cost, affordable options for consumers. This is the hallmark of a free market and spurs competition under most circumstances.

However, such businesses often pay grievously for their vision.

State Boards killing good ideas like Non-Dental Teeth Whitening

Teeth Whitening banned in North Carolina

In the case of Legalzoom, the state of North Carolina contended that allowing people access to self-help with regards to legal forms could only be construed as “the unauthorized practice of law.”

North Carolina took a similar stance trying to regulate teeth whitening, recently buckling under the power of The United States Supreme Court ruling that put an end to the teeth whitening debate for every state.

The Supreme Court ruled that state licensing boards, comprised primarily of market participants, do not have automatic immunity from antitrust laws.

North Carolina Board of Dental Examiners v. Federal Trade Commission dealt a setback to what has become an increasingly common form of attempts by state licensing boards to regulate trade that competes with their participants.

The birth of today’s non-dental teeth whitening serves as the best example to illustrate the path of consumer demand and the intersection of state licensing.

While popularity for teeth whitening gained momentum in the 1990s, the cost for dental teeth whitening was prohibitive. Dentists charged upwards of $400.00 for teeth whitening, and the process itself was extreme.

Sitting in a dental chair, under harsh lightening with a solution so strong it had to be monitored, its understandable how dentists may have viewed these measures as needing the skill of a licensed dentist to oversee the results.

Dentists didn’t understand

However, what dentists failed to take into account was that not everyone needed, or wanted, such extreme teeth whitening measures. Not content with the status quo, kiosks and individual businesses developed lower cost, less invasive alternatives to the dental chair.

As a result, the expanding market demanded options. The dentists, in conjunction with the North Carolina Dental Board, worked to scrupulously destroy all options but the dentist. Attempting to put non-dental teeth whitening out of business, the North Carolina Dental Board illegally thwarted teeth whitening options. Consequently, this lead to higher prices in dental teeth whitening and reduced choices for consumers.

In cease and desist orders that forced small businesses to close their doors and stop offering non-dental teeth whitening, the North Carolina Dental Board effectively worked to gain exclusive rights to teeth whitening for their local dentists.

Retrospectively, some of the arguments seem ridiculous. An expert for The North Carolina Dental Board, Dr. Haywood referred to businesses that offer non-dental teeth whitening as “charlatans,” “quacks,” and “thieves,” comparing the process to “assisted suicide.”

It’s quite clear that dentists wanted to believe non-dental teeth whitening inherently dangerous, requiring the care of a licensed dentist.

Millions of people with whiter smiles and larger bank accounts have proved that false. Dr. Haywood’s unsupported positions no longer bear the same weight. As a result, non-dental teeth whitening is as common as dental floss, and no one is the worse for it.

Far from being inherently dangerous to the public, Legalzoom, teeth whitening, Uber, Tesla, and Press On Veneers emerge as pioneers on the side of a public that has had its patience exhausted by having their options challenged and limited by self-interested state licensing boards.

Technology will continue to push options like non-dental teeth whitening

In conclusion, no matter what the future holds, technology is changing the options available. The benefits to the consumer will only increase. It’s worth noting the rules are evolving where self-help and the rights of consumers’ are concerned. Far too many people possess limited time and resources to cave to the pressure of outdated methods of doing business. State boards continue to force these practices on a savvy population. Citizens who can just as easily find an answer without their help with no ill effects whatsoever.

Find out how Press On Veneers is working to create affordable new smile enhancements. Transform the appearance of your smile without a dentist visit. Before you pay thousands for Lumineers or a Snap On Smile, call with Laurie Hall today about your removable veneer. On the cutting edge of technology, a beautiful, affordable smile is now your choice.

Composite Resin Veneers by Brighter Image Lab

Composite Resin Veneers and Porcelain Veneers

Many people ask every day what the difference is between composite resin veneers and porcelain veneers. Dentists have long touted the benefits of porcelain veneers, but read on to find out if new composite resin veneers may be right for you.

Composite Resin Veneers vs Porcelain Veneers

Everyone who has ever attended a job interview has witnessed the importance of first impressions. For better or for worse, we make an impression with everything we say and even more with what we don’t say. As we age, we become even more aware of malocclusion as crooked teeth and broken teeth begin to interfere with critical aspects of our lives. If you suffer from crooked teeth, you know the effects can be devastating and long lasting, even more so as a young adult. Social stigma related to a bad dental condition takes a sharper and more devastating turn as the appearance of your teeth begins to dictate what jobs you will get and impacts your ability to date.

Porcelain Veneers is usually the first choice

For this reason, many people begin to look at porcelain veneers for crooked teeth. Often, people dive right in without fully evaluating the process. Far more than just “up front costs,” getting porcelain or composite veneers is a long-term commitment. Asking “how dental veneers work” is the first step to learning if Lumineers and veneers are the right choice. Some people suffer from conditions such as severe discoloration, protruding teeth, or crowding requiring grinding to attain the desired effect. The condition of your teeth and your expectation can run the cost for porcelain veneers into the tens of thousands.

Composite Resin Veneers are a viable option

According to the ADA, composite resin veneers are made from a tooth-colored filling material bonded to the tooth. At $250.00 to $350.00 per tooth, the composite resin veneers cost seems like a more affordable option of all dental veneer prices. Composite resin veneers last between four and eight years and require “maintenance”. Maintenance means two teeth cleanings and checkups a year and paying out of pocket when the composite resin veneers chip. Which they do. Less strong than porcelain veneers, the composite veneers are not as resistant to daily wear and tear. Habitual grinding or clenching of teeth, can easily break dental veneers and send you back for repair or replacement.

Learn more about Composite Resin Veneers

Before committing to a process you cannot undo and veneers that may chip and come loose, call Laurie Hall. Ask about a dental snap on smile that doesn’t make you commit to grinding your teeth down. Visit Brighter Image Lab at brighterimagelab.com to view removable veneers online with no dentist visit. From Australia to the UK, we have helped thousands who want to change their smile without fixing their teeth. We understand everyone wants a noticeable personality, not a conspicuous smile. We help you achieve that while you figure out the best choice for you.

There are a lot of really great dentists out there. Sometimes, in our line of work, it’s easy to forget that. Often, it seems there is a better chance of a rich dentist overcharging people than a good dentist helping them. But that’s not true. Most dentists are good people, trying to do a good job for their patients. We don’t dislike dentists. In fact, those who get to know us really do see the value in what we offer. As a result, many end up working WITH us in a truly symbiotic relationship.

What is ‘Disruptive Technology’?

The reality is that our Lab Direct Products anger a big portion of the industry. In marketing terms, we’re considered a ‘disruptive technology’. That’s just a fancy way to say we’ve found a new way of doing things, changing the status quo. Changing the status quo can be upsetting for the people who are locked into maintaining the status quo. Dentists like the status quo… So most doctors labeled a “rich dentist” don’t like us.

The following exchange occurred earlier this week in the comment section of one of our YouTube videos. A “rich dentist” out of Atlanta Georgia decided to voice a rather unfavorable opinion of our company although, he never actually dealt with us at all. Moreover, he had no idea that our CEO was logged in at the time and prepared to defend our business vehemently.

Dr. Justin Scott: seriously though, i understand your argument that these are temporary fix for people that aren’t ready to pay for what is actually needed and to get them through until they are ready but this is deceptive in that you are saying that people shouldn’t pay thousands of dollars for traditional veneers and that this was a better idea.. very unethical…

Discovery of a “rich dentist”

(Through research we learned this “rich dentist” set up his practice in one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in the state. Filled with iPads, flat screen TVs and maintaining a top-shelf website, their office caters to affluent clientele.)

Brighter Image Lab: Dr. Justin Scott and Dr. Lydia Muccioli of Pure Dental Health; I respectfully – whole heartedly disagree. You cannot speak for the same people you refuse to serve. You cannot sit in your ivory tower in one of most expensive areas of Atlanta GA, searching to attract wealthy clients (the ones who need you the least) and talk down a product that you could be using to put many people back to work – back to looking and feeling better and back to not being ashamed to simply smile in public.

Even when money isn’t a factor, many people still would not choose to give a dentist between $5,000 and $15,000 to grind their existing teeth (prep for traditional veneers) just to be able to smile. Removable Dental Veneers are advancing in design and technology everyday and everyday we hear from clients that walked out of a dentist office holding a ridiculous $13,000 (so called) treatment plan and tell us their dentist advertised low cost snap smiles but really just tried to get them to filling out a credit app for financing and payments on a more invasive procedure. You’re using the solution people actually want as bait to up-sell them. I think that is deceptive. I think that is unethical!

Often, A “Rich Dentist” Sells Similar Products

Dr. Justin Scott: We do snap on smiles for temporary purposes. We also educate people that over time these will encourage further deterioration and breakdown and eventually will lead to catastrophic failing in the inability to wear anything but a denture. You are speeding up that process my friend and not educating people along the way of the consequences. You should be telling people this is a bandaid for temporary esthetic improvement and not downplaying the importance of health.

Brighter Image Lab: Dr. Justin Scott, The fact you think that people will actually confuse putting a removable, cosmetic veneer over their teeth, with an oral health treatment shows just how little you think of your patients and their intelligence. Why don’t you come out and say what you keep dancing around? You think people are too stupid to know that difference between covering their teeth and fixing their teeth. We disagree with your elitist attitude, we disagree with your assessment of your patients’ intelligence and we disagree with your industry for being so blind to the real need around you, and so quick to find fault in others trying to help.

It’s all about the information

Dr. Justin Scott: It’s not about lack of intelligence it’s about not having the information. I’m sure they know something is wrong but they don’t know how to fix it. My point is that your post makes the assumption that it is unnecessary to spend money at the dentist and that your product fixes that. It doesn’t and that is wrong. You can make whatever assumptions about me you like but maybe you should just change your marketing content to remove any suggestions that paying money for a professional dental work is anything other than absolutely necessary and inevitable. I’m not even saying you should not promote your benefits. I am not saying you should warn them that there teeth could get worse (although ethically you should). I’m just saying don’t pretend like dental recommendations are somehow unnecessary

The “Rich Dentist” Revelation

(We also learned that the “rich dentist” in this office was purchasing fake online reviews. So, in the interest of full disclosure, we posted that information publicly.)

Dr. Justin Scott: And then you have the nerve to leave a bad review on my website. Unethical indeed

(Dr. Scott then decided to “help” some other commenters by giving them false information about our product.)

A “Rich Dentist” Likes The Status-Quo

Brighter Image Lab: Again you know nothing about my product… the thousands of hours it took to develop it… or the thousands of dollars spent with Harvard and MIT research developers. If a patient told you they were wearing Invisalign all day – you would not dare offer the same advice in a public venue. As for the bad review – I’ve certainly had a bad experience from a dentist trying to promote their practice by appearing to be ‘all knowing’ on a product they know nothing about- have never seen and for which they’ve never attempted to consider the possible advantages. It should bother everyone who reads this that you simply have yet to admit you know nothing about how to make our product, yet you blindly instruct others as to what is does and how’s its made.

You don’t know me, to call me unethical is just you rich doctor way of cursing at me because you’ve been faced with a subject you don’t understand. You do not know my work ethic, dedication, passion or where my choices come from.

The Real Problem with a “Rich Dentist”

Brighter Image Lab: The real problem is this: Dentists all over the country refuse stand up against the State Dental Boards, or push back against the status quo. If dentists like you could fight to make dentistry more accessible, more approachable, more affordable – find a way to make teeth cleaning easier to get than a tattoo or tongue piercing -then dentist offices across the country would have lines out the doors instead of sitting nearly empty, chasing cancellations and drawing in soccer moms that will fall for your cheap teeth whitening scam and fake yelp reviews.

​Until then, I’m sure you’ll continue to troll the internet and continue being very concerned about one bad review stemming from a fight you started out of ignorance.

No Desire to fight with any “Rich Dentist”

We want you to understand that we don’t go around looking to argue our belief system with a “rich dentist”. We don’t think what we do requires us to defend it. Our clients are the justification we need to continue to provide low-cost smile makeovers to people who really need them. People sometimes ask why we don’t sell through dentists. Well, this interaction with a “rich dentist” is a big part of it. A lot of doctors labeled a “rich dentist” don’t remember what it’s like to see their bank account empty once the bills are paid, and too many are more concerned with upgrading their lease to the new BMW than finding a way to make dental work REALLY- TRULY affordable.

The Decline of Dental Care in America

Picture the ideal “American dream” family. A father with a job that pays well, a nurturing mother, and their 2.5 children. This family has the time and money to schedule all of their necessary dental care.

In this reality, the father’s job probably has excellent benefits that include dental insurance. The mother will take the children to their dentist appointments. The children grow up with the assurance of regular dental care. The kind of care that provides braces to fix any issues with their smile.

This upper middle-class family with already perfect teeth easily makes the recommended bi-annual trips to the dentist for upkeep. Unfortunately, this is not an actuality for the majority of families. Many poor and lower-middle-class families do not receive adequate dental care, in part because most dentists want customers who can pay cash or have private insurance.

This prevalent problem raises the following question. Is the dentist in the habit of helping people, or in the business of making money? Look at the following statistics and decide for yourself.

The Cost of Dental Care in America

Rising dentist incomes reflect the lack of dental care for those who can't afford itDentist fees have risen much faster than inflation. In real dollars, the cost of the average dentist procedure rose 25% from 1996 to 2004.

In addition, dentists’ incomes have grown much faster than that of the typical worker. American dentists in general practice made an average salary of $164,570 in 2012. In contrast, the average salary among the general public was $51,017 that same year.

Average household income can't afford dental careThe American Dental Association believes this imbalance comes from a shortage of dentists. However, we believe the true problem stems from dentists unwillingness to practice in areas where they are needed.

Dentists have a disproportionate presence in affluent suburbs. However, those who are most in need of care are concentrated in inner cities and rural communities. As many as 130 million Americans do not have dental insurance coverage. Some of those have to use Medicaid to even gain access to dental care.

The State of Dental Care in America

Unfortunately, only about 20% of the nation’s practicing dentists provide care to people with Medicaid. Of those who do, only a small percentage primarily serve the poor, chronically ill, or rural communities.

The “typical” family referenced earlier is merely a fantasy for the majority of hard-working people. Taking care of a family doesn’t afford regular dental visits, much less any sort of cosmetic dentistry.

Those who can afford dental care don’t need it. Those who need dental care can’t afford it, and as a result, may be in desperate need of a dentist.

Affordable Dental Choices are Available

Brighter Image Lab is providing an affordable dental choice with their Press On Veneers since 2010, and BILVeneers just introduced in 2017.