Tag Archives: dentist

Composite Resin Veneers by Brighter Image Lab

Composite Resin Veneers and Porcelain Veneers

Many people ask every day what the difference is between composite resin veneers and porcelain veneers. Dentists have long touted the benefits of porcelain veneers, but read on to find out if new composite resin veneers may be right for you.

Composite Resin Veneers vs Porcelain Veneers

Everyone who has ever attended a job interview has witnessed the importance of first impressions. For better or for worse, we make an impression with everything we say and even more with what we don’t say. As we age, we become even more aware of malocclusion as crooked teeth and broken teeth begin to interfere with critical aspects of our lives. If you suffer from crooked teeth, you know the effects can be devastating and long lasting, even more so as a young adult. Social stigma related to a bad dental condition takes a sharper and more devastating turn as the appearance of your teeth begins to dictate what jobs you will get and impacts your ability to date.

Porcelain Veneers is usually the first choice

For this reason, many people begin to look at porcelain veneers for crooked teeth. Often, people dive right in without fully evaluating the process. Far more than just “up front costs,” getting porcelain or composite veneers is a long-term commitment. Asking “how dental veneers work” is the first step to learning if Lumineers and veneers are the right choice. Some people suffer from conditions such as severe discoloration, protruding teeth, or crowding requiring grinding to attain the desired effect. The condition of your teeth and your expectation can run the cost for porcelain veneers into the tens of thousands.

Composite Resin Veneers are a viable option

According to the ADA, composite resin veneers are made from a tooth-colored filling material bonded to the tooth. At $250.00 to $350.00 per tooth, the composite resin veneers cost seems like a more affordable option of all dental veneer prices. Composite resin veneers last between four and eight years and require “maintenance”. Maintenance means two teeth cleanings and checkups a year and paying out of pocket when the composite resin veneers chip. Which they do. Less strong than porcelain veneers, the composite veneers are not as resistant to daily wear and tear. Habitual grinding or clenching of teeth, can easily break dental veneers and send you back for repair or replacement.

Learn more about Composite Resin Veneers

Before committing to a process you cannot undo and veneers that may chip and come loose, call Laurie Hall. Ask about a dental snap on smile that doesn’t make you commit to grinding your teeth down. Visit Brighter Image Lab at brighterimagelab.com to view removable veneers online with no dentist visit. From Australia to the UK, we have helped thousands who want to change their smile without fixing their teeth. We understand everyone wants a noticeable personality, not a conspicuous smile. We help you achieve that while you figure out the best choice for you.

Removable Veneers by Brighter Image Lab

Smile again with removable veneers

School is out and summer is upon us! Warmer weather makes everyone yearn to be outside, get active, and get some sunshine. Summer is also the time when we catch up with friends, travel, and visit family. Some people dread these events rather than anticipate them because of a challenged smile. Without removable veneers, a bad smile leaves you uncomfortable in social settings where you have to hide your smile.

Snap-On Smile introduces removable veneers

Lumineers and Snap-On Smile have historically offered a way past that challenge with removable veneers through your family dentist. The Snap-On Smile was created to bring people into the closest dentist. Offered as an entry level component to Lumineers porcelain veneers, only dentists carry them. People with bad teeth visited a dentist asking for removable veneers, hoping for a quick fix to a bad smile.

However, nobody wants to go to the dentist to find out they aren’t a candidate for removable veneers. Moreover, when asked, “How much does Snap-On Smile cost,” most people find that $3000.00 for removable veneers is beyond their means. With no dental coupon or low-income dental care offered for the Snap-On smile, there was no option in the past. Insurance does not typically pay for cosmetic procedures, and there were no Snap-On Smile alternatives. That leaves two bad choices: pay a lot for a Snap-On Smile or suffer with a challenged smile.

Removable Veneers by Brighter Image LabPress On Veneers

But that isn’t the case anymore. Bil Watson of Brighter Image Lab believed that people deserved better. Rather than approaching the problem as solely dental issue, Bil knew there was a better way to make help affordable and available without a dentist. He tackled the problem not from a dental perspective, but from a purely technological standpoint.

In much the same way that sunglasses keep the glare out and afford you a level of comfort and obscurity without a prescription from an optometrist, removable dental veneers provide a similar relief for people who simply want the social comfort of covering their teeth from the judgment of others.

Contact Brighter Image Lab

If you’re one of the people dreading summer activities and social engagement because of a bad smile, you need to visit www.pressonveneers.com. Call Brighter Image Lab and ask to speak to Laurie Hall to find out how Press On Veneers can help you enjoy your summer by introducing you to a temporary, removable smile enhancement.

Dentist Office

How dental marketing keeps me from visiting the dentist office

School was out! I think the only person more excited about the end of school, besides the school staff, was me. No more 6:30 wake up alarms for a solid month. Looking forward to a full seven hours of sleep, excitement filled my inner being. Then the reality of summer chores hit me. My list included athletic physicals, lawn mowing in the brutal Texas heat, and the dreaded trip to our local family dentist office.

Going to teeth cleaning was about as much fun for me as—nothing I can think of. As the Rolodex of chores whirred through my head, I paused at the dentist office to try for a second to wrap my mind around why I dreaded the task so much. Unlike so many people, I have insurance and access to dental health services.

Every dentist office was the same

The dental care associates that we had seen were all nice enough, but something about the process always put my teeth on edge, literally. It was never better in one dentist office than another. In a small town, my insurance company paid for X-rays I didn’t have time for. In a large town, I waited so far past my scheduled time that I felt like sending the dentist office a bill for my hourly rate.

Thinking it through, I realized that I feel constantly bombarded with dental marketing without any corresponding perceived value on my part. You see, if I felt “cared for” when I left, I might feel differently. However, I can barely tell one stagnant waiting room equipped with 24/7 Disney from another.

Dentist office or car dealership?

Between the Groupon offers, the Internet pop-ups, and the waving Zoom teeth whitening balloons, I feel stalked by dental professionals who see me as nothing more than a dollar sign and never as a person with financial difficulties. In fact, the only place that I have felt that hunted is the new car lot. Like so many people, I’ve sneaked in late at night to a closed chain car dealership just to avoid feeling like a bunny rabbit coated in Marinara sauce. All in the attempt to make an informed decision absent the sales pressure.

Dentist OfficeBetween the Groupon offers, the Internet pop-ups, and the waving Zoom teeth whitening balloons, I feel stalked by dental professionals who see me as a dollar sign and never as a person. In fact, the only place that I have felt that hunted is the new car lot. Like so many people, I’ve sneaked in at night to a closed dealership just to avoid feeling like a bunny rabbit coated in Marinara sauce. All in the attempt to make an informed decision absent the sales pressure.

The dentist office tacks cancer screenings and gum tissue measurements and a whole list of things they never did in the past onto my bill without question. Every time I pass a dentist office with the waving balloon I wonder why he’s so broke that he’s scrambling for my kid’s fluoride treatment like it’s the only thing that’s going to buy his lunch that day.

We need dental care, not dental retail

It wasn’t always that way. Dental care used to rank right next to medical care on the list of respectable professions. In the past, the only reason to dread going to the dentist office was the drill. Today, that’s the least of my worries. Oral hygiene shouldn’t be a fight. Anyone should be able to walk into a dentist office that is clean and calm, and feel like that professional has your best interest at heart. That’s what’s they used to call “a practice”. I would give my business to a place like that in a heartbeat. For life.That’s what people want when they need dental help. They’re fighting to protect themselves from professionals taking more and giving less. Less empathy, relationship, time, and education. Less dedication to the patient. The effect is endemic. The consequences for peoples’ oral health and the dentists who serve us is verging on catastrophic.

It’s not the dentists’ fault

Completing years of training, student loans, obtaining a license, and opening an office just to beg people to come in. Discounting procedures, installing iPads, and renting giant roadside balloons to bring patients in. Having to practice creative dentistry just to make it? Something is utterly broken.The dentists and we suffer this together, and yet we seem pitted against each other. Having gone through the issue, I came to the root of it: As a pacifist, I avoid conflict. I don’t want to fight my dentist (or anyone), and so I do the next best thing—Avoidance. Informing myself, I felt empowered with both my own interest and my dentist’s interest at heart.

The fight with the dentist office continues…

I felt the best approach was to get educated before going in. Knowing we’d engage in the same bi-yearly argument regarding fluoride treatments for kids, I prepared myself. I pulled up research and Youtube to see what was going on in the fluoride debate these days. Turns out, the tickle I felt about too much fluoride was real. But that’s an issue for another day.

Is the Creative Diagnosis by a Texas Dentist really a ripoff?

My household’s level of confidence in dentistry is at an all-time low due to creative diagnosis. About six months ago, my Texas dentist informed me that my “bunny teeth” were likely getting in the way of my professional success, a problem he could correct with a (pricey) cosmetic procedure.

If I let him fix my teeth, he told me, he was sure I would start “dressing better.” A few months later, my husband scheduled a basic cleaning with a new Texas Dentist.

Once they had him in the chair and looked at his teeth, they informed him that the regular cleaning wouldn’t do at all: He would need to reschedule for an $800 deep cleaning. Creative diagnosis? No thanks.

We were convinced we must look like suckers—until I came across an op-ed in ADANews, the official publication of the American Dental Association. The article, by longtime pediatric dentist Jeffrey Camm, described a disturbing trend he called creative diagnosis — the peddling of unnecessary treatments.

The Mystery of Creative Diagnostics by Dentists

William van Dyk, a Northern California dentist of 41 years, saw Camm’s op-ed and wrote in: “I especially love the patients that come in for second opinions after the previous dentist found multiple thousands of dollars in necessary treatment where nothing had been found six months earlier. And, when we look, there is nothing to diagnose.”

“In recent years, I have been seeing more and more creative diagnosis,” Camm told me when I called him at his practice in Washington state. A Texas dentist, he said, might think, “‘Well, the insurance covers this crown, so I’m not hurting this patient, so why don’t I just do it?’ That’s the absolutely wrong approach.”

Poking around, I found plenty of services catering to Texas dentists hoping to increase their incomes. One lecturer at a privately operated seminar called The Profitable Dentist ($389) aimed to help “dentists to reignite their passion for dentistry while increasing their profit and time away from the office.”

Is the ADA Perpetuating Creative Diagnosing?

Even the ADA’s 2014 annual conference offered tips for maximizing revenue: “Taking time to help our patients want what we know they need,” notes one session description, “can drive the economic and reward engine of our practice.” Could this be the source of creative diagnosis?

Do you think you’ve been the victim of “creative diagnosis” from any of these dentists?

Name

Website

Phone

Address

Rodolfo “Rudy” G. Ramos Jr., D.D.S., P.C.http://www.rudyramosdds.com/

(713) 973-9591

9545 Katy Freeway, Ste. 125, Houston, Texas, 77024
Steven Austin, D.D.S.http://drsteveaustin.com

(806) 358-7646

2815 South Georgia, Amarillo, Texas, 79109
Tamela L. Gough, D.D.S., M.S.http://www.allenkidsdentist.com/

(972) 727-0737

201 N Alma Dr Ste 100, Allen, Texas, 75013
James W. Chancellor, D.D.S.

(210) 653-4410

4952 Windsor Hill, Suite 201, San Antonio, Texas, 78239
D. Bradley Dean, D.D.S.http://www.ntxpa.com/

(972) 964-2900

3900 American Drive, Suite 101, Plano , Texas, 75075
Christie Leedy, D.D.Shttp://www.abilenedental.com/

(325) 692-3344

5309 Buffalo Gap Rd, Abilene, Texas, 79606
Kirby Bunel Jr., D.D.S.http://www.texarkanacosmeticdentistry.com/

(903) 794-3331

1701 Moores Lane, Texarkana, Texas, 75503
Dr. Mark Peppard, DDShttp://www.pepdds.com/

(512) 835-9557

4005 Spicewood Springs Road, Building C, Ste 500, Austin, Texas, 78759
Dr. Jennifer Bonehttp://hillcountrydentalassociates.com/

(830) 257-3000

710 Hill Country Dr #1, Kerrville, Texas, 78028
Dr. Donna Miller, DDShttp://creekwooddentalarts.com/

(254) 772-3632

7911 Woodway Drive, Waco, Texas, 76712
Dr. Ronald Rheahttp://www.dentistsattcv.com/rhea.html

(713) 467-3458

791 Town & Country Blvd Suite 222, Houston, Texas, 77024
Dr. Craig Armstrong, DDShttp://www.craigarmstrongdds.com/

(832) 251-1234

10370 Richmond Avenue, Suite 780, Houston, Texas, 77042

Upselling in dentistry isn’t a new phenomenon, but it’s having a moment. One reason: Texas Dental school tuition—and debt—has doubled since the ’90s.

Is High Debt Causing Creative Diagnosis by a Texas Dentist?

According to the American Dental Education Association, students who graduated in 1996 were in the hole $112,000 (in 2013 dollars), on average, while 2013 grads were a whopping $215,000 in debt—28 percent were on the hook for $300,000 or more.

By contrast, the average med school grad owed $170,000. ADEA executive director Richard Valachovic explained that one reason dental schools have jacked up tuitions is the rising costs of technology for student labs.

In any case, a generation ago, newly hatched Texas dentists would join established practices as modestly paid associates, with the promise of eventually becoming partners. But these days, with dentists retiring later, there’s less turnover in private practice tempting new dentists to engage in creative diagnosis.

Are Dental Chains Asking Dentists to Diagnose Creatively?

Instead, more and more young dentists are taking jobs with chains, many of which set revenue quotas for practitioners. This has created some legal backlash: In 2012, for example, 11 patients sued (PDF) a 450-office chain called Aspen Dental, claiming that its model turns dentists into salespeople.

Some corporate dentists appear to have crossed the line into fraud. In 2010, Small Smiles, a venture-capital-owned chain with offices in 20 states, was ordered to refund $24 million to the government after an investigation found that its dentists had been performing unnecessary extractions, fillings, and root canals on children covered by Medicaid. Could these corporations be the reason behind creative diagnosis?

A new lawsuit alleges that some toddlers it treated underwent as many as 14 procedures—often under restraint and without anesthesia. (The group was banned from Medicaid this year.) Several other pediatric dentistry chains have been sued as a result of similar allegations.

Advice for Creative Diagnostic Attempts by Your Dentist

So how can you spot creative diagnosis when you go for your next cleaning? First, beware of specials: That laser dentistry and whitening package may be a ploy to get you in the door so the practice can upsell you on more-profitable procedures.

Van Dyk also advises caution if your Texas dentist insists on replacing old fillings or recommends crowns instead of fillings. And look out for excessive X-rays: The ADA says healthy patients need a full set (14 to 22) every two years at the most.

If your Texas dentist recommends a special “cone-beam” X-ray, get a second opinion. Along with a 3-D picture of your mouth, it delivers radiation up to 18X that of a traditional dental X-ray.

Radiation experts worry that some Texas dentists are substituting FDA approved cone-beam scanners for a standard X-ray.

Dealing with Creative Diagnosis in Pediatrics by a Texas Dentist

Finally, when it comes to children’s dentists, make sure to find a board-certified pediatric specialist. Not all dentists that cater to children have special training.

The practitioners I spoke to were quick to add that even dubious-sounding treatments are in some cases medically necessary, and not necessarily creative diagnosis.

In conclusion, if your gut says your dentist is going overboard on treatment, get a second opinion. “Will you have to pay a little more for another consult?” Camm asks. “Sure. But it could end up saving you a whole lot more in the long run.”

Curated from Is Your Dentist Ripping You Off? | Mother Jones

The Decline of Dental Care in America

Picture the ideal “American dream” family. A father with a job that pays well, a nurturing mother, and their 2.5 children. This family has the time and money to schedule all of their necessary dental care.

In this reality, the father’s job probably has excellent benefits that include dental insurance. The mother will take the children to their dentist appointments. The children grow up with the assurance of regular dental care. The kind of care that provides braces to fix any issues with their smile.

This upper middle-class family with already perfect teeth easily makes the recommended bi-annual trips to the dentist for upkeep. Unfortunately, this is not an actuality for the majority of families. Many poor and lower-middle-class families do not receive adequate dental care, in part because most dentists want customers who can pay cash or have private insurance.

This prevalent problem raises the following question. Is the dentist in the habit of helping people, or in the business of making money? Look at the following statistics and decide for yourself.

The Cost of Dental Care in America

Rising dentist incomes reflect the lack of dental care for those who can't afford itDentist fees have risen much faster than inflation. In real dollars, the cost of the average dentist procedure rose 25% from 1996 to 2004.

In addition, dentists’ incomes have grown much faster than that of the typical worker. American dentists in general practice made an average salary of $164,570 in 2012. In contrast, the average salary among the general public was $51,017 that same year.

Average household income can't afford dental careThe American Dental Association believes this imbalance comes from a shortage of dentists. However, we believe the true problem stems from dentists unwillingness to practice in areas where they are needed.

Dentists have a disproportionate presence in affluent suburbs. However, those who are most in need of care are concentrated in inner cities and rural communities. As many as 130 million Americans do not have dental insurance coverage. Some of those have to use Medicaid to even gain access to dental care.

The State of Dental Care in America

Unfortunately, only about 20% of the nation’s practicing dentists provide care to people with Medicaid. Of those who do, only a small percentage primarily serve the poor, chronically ill, or rural communities.

The “typical” family referenced earlier is merely a fantasy for the majority of hard-working people. Taking care of a family doesn’t afford regular dental visits, much less any sort of cosmetic dentistry.

Those who can afford dental care don’t need it. Those who need dental care can’t afford it, and as a result, may be in desperate need of a dentist.

Affordable Dental Choices are Available

Brighter Image Lab is providing an affordable dental choice with their Press On Veneers since 2010, and BILVeneers just introduced in 2017.